SPR Awards

Maureen Andrew Mentor Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

Established in 2003, the Maureen Andrew Mentor Award honors the contributions of Dr. Maureen Andrew to the field of child health research. The award recognizes outstanding mentor leadership that generates excitement, creativity and scholarships leading to outstanding research and teaching.

Criteria: 

  • Must be a Pediatrician.
  • Must have a sustained record of excellence as a mentor, defined as an individual who demonstrates attributes of teacher, sponsor, guide, mentor, counselor.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • The recipient must attend the PAS Meeting.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for 2 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $1,000 during the PAS Meeting.
  • The Committee for the Maureen Andrew Mentor Award will be solely responsible for the selection of the recipients.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.

Nomination Requirements 

  • Current Curriculum Vitae of the Nominee
    • Include Supervisory/Mentor activities.
    • Research productivity by Mentees should be indicated by highlighting the names in each publication.
  • List of Mentees
    • Present as a spreadsheet or table.
    • Include the following: Training/Faculty level at time of mentorship, current academic appointment, indication as to whether mentees are currently recipients of operating grants awarded by NIH and/or non-governmental organizations, other academic leadership or research contributions (e.g. research awards).
  • List of Mentoring Activities (other than direct supervision of research)
    • Could include leadership within a training grant, development/implementation of mentoring activities at local, national or international level, mentoring activities within professional organizations and academic health science centers.
  • Letter of Nomination and 3 Letters of Support (4 letters total)
    • Letters should provide evidence regarding how nominee has displayed mentor-related attributes including sponsor, mentor, guide, role model and counselor.
    • Letters should include the impact of the nominee’s mentorship on the career development of those mentored.

Thomas A. Hazinski Distinguished Service

This award was established by the SPR Council in 2002 and honors a special individual who has provided exceptional service to the Society over an extended period of time.

Public recognition of the award will be during the SPR Presidential Plenary Session at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting.

Society for Pediatric Research Award in honor of E Mead Johnson

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

Since 1939, the SPR Award in honor of E. Mead Johnson has recognized outstanding clinical and laboratory pediatric research achievements. The most prestigious award presented by the SPR, this honor recognizes E. Mead Johnson’s legacy of research excellence and impact on child health that continues to inspire the pediatric community today.

Criteria:

  • Must have received first doctoral degree in 1999 or later. (Nominators of candidates who have interrupted their research career for 2 or more years may request that the committee waives this stipulation).
  • Must have displayed research contributions related to pediatrics published within recent years.
  • Strong record of independent research productivity.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for up to 4 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $12,500 during the PAS 2018 Meeting. Awardee will give lecture following presentation.
  • The Committee for the E. Mead Johnson Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.
  • Supported by Mead Johnson Nutrition.
  • Award winner will be under no obligation to Mead Johnson Nutrition.

Nomination Requirements 

  • Current Curriculum Vitae of the Nominee
    • Include bibliography of published works of nominee with an asterisk next to the most significant contributions.
    • Indicate record of research productivity.
  • Detailed Letter of Nomination
    • Originality of the research work.
    • Independent investigation or collaboration.
    • Soundness of investigation and value of research work in contributing basic knowledge to overall field of pediatrics Include references to literature where appropriate.
    • Include national and/or international recognition.
  • 2 Letters of Support
    • One letter should be outside of the nominee’s institution.
    • Letters should not be from a direct collaborator/co-author of the nominee.
  • 3 Recent Articles (within last 5 years)
    • Reflect nominee’s best work.
    • Selection of these works is a major point of evaluation.

Douglas K. Richardson Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

This award was established to honor Dr. Douglas K. Richardson’s contributions to child health services, perinatal and pediatric research, and the Society for Pediatric Research. The award honors the lifetime achievement of an investigator who has made substantive contributions in child health.

Criteria: 

  • Must be child health researchers of any specialty or advanced degree, including PhD researchers.
  • Must have displayed sustained record of excellence as a clinical investigator.
  • Does not have to be a member of Society for Pediatric Research.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for 2 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $500 at the PAS Meeting. Awardee will give lecture following presentation.
  • The Committee for the Douglas K. Richardson Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.

Nomination Requirements

  • Curriculum Vitae of Nominee
    • Include research activities.
  • Detailed Letter of Nomination
    • Provide evidence of substantive research contributions in the following.
  • Effective utilization of healthcare services.
  • Identification of risk factors for adverse outcomes.
  • General epidemiologic health services studies.
  • Patient-oriented clinical studies that lead of improved healthcare delivery to neonatal or broad pediatric population.
  • 3 Letters of Support (other than Nominator)
    • Should substantiate the nominee’s research career achievements and/or
    • Evidence of mentorship.

Physician Scientist Award: Bridging to Success

Deadline for Submission – Jan. 2, 2019

The mission of SPR is to create a network of multidisciplinary researchers to improve child health. Implicit in our mission is our foundational commitment to supporting the success of young investigators in child health research through activities that include facilitation of connection with peers, potential collaborators and national mentors. This year we are continuing this program, which was initiated in 2017, to achieve this goal.

The SPR Pediatric Research Physician Scientist Award supports transitioning pediatric physician scientists who have submitted a K08 or K23 award, which although not funded, may be potentially competitive on resubmission to the NIH.

The support mechanism consists of $40,000 awarded to the sponsoring institution with no indirect costs.  The sponsoring institution and Department must match the $40,000, thereby constituting $80,000 of the awardee support for one year. Salary support is the preferred mechanism of support though alternative uses of awarded funds may be considered on a case-by-case basis if justification for the use of funds for non-salary-related costs (which must be provided by the awardee) is approved by the SPR Awards committee.  In all cases, at least 75% protected research effort must be assured. The award does not allow for fringe or indirect costs and these costs should be covered by the institution from separate sources.  The $40,000 will be dispersed in two 6-month installments.  If the awardee receives a K-grant during the first 6-months, the awardees become ineligible for the final 6-month installment and the remaining funds will be offered to the runner-up.

Eligibility Criteria.  

1) MD and/or MD/PhD applicant who is an SPR member or SPR junior section member (rolling admission for SPR junior section applicants is available).

2) K08 or K23 application summary statement dated within the 2 calendar years of this RFA.

Application Requirements. A Letter of Intent signed by the applicant and sponsoring department chair should be submitted by January 2, 2019.   The Letter of Intent should include the following:

1) Agreement by the sponsoring department/institution to match the SPR award and to contribute the total amount to salary and/or research program of the awardee.

2) A statement assuring that the awardee will have 75% effort protected for research during the award year.

3) Specific Aims page of the supporting K08 or K23 application.

4) Summary Statement from the review of the supporting K08 or K23 dated January 1, 2017 or later.

5) Commitment from the applicant to provide SPR with requested updates on the outcome of the revised the K08 or K23 application submitted by the applicant after receipt of this award.

Based on review of the letters of intent, finalists will be chosen to submit a full package which will include the previously submitted K-award application, cover letter on how the support will be used for 12 months, and specific plans on how the applicant plans to revise the K-award application.  An awardee will also be invited to present his/her research as part of the SPR Presidential Scientific Plenary.  Finalists and awardees will be recognized at the SPR Awards luncheon of the PAS meeting.   There will also be opportunity for finalists to be matched to national SPR mentors within the Young Investigator Coaching program of the SPR, if desired.

Outstanding New Member Science Award

The Society for Pediatric Research recognizes new members who have contributed to high quality scientific research and who continue to demonstrate meaningful contributions in the pediatric academic field.  As an honor for new members conducting exceptional research, the SPR Council selects two individuals to present their research during the SPR Presidential Plenary of the PAS Meeting.

Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce

Deadline for Submission – March 15, 2019

SPR aims to create a network of multidisciplinary researchers to improve child health. Ensuring a diversified research workforce is essential to this goal.

This award was established by the SPR Council in 2017 and provides up to $1,000 travel expenses to the annual PAS Meeting for talented child health researchers who comes from an underrepresented background (as defined by NIH https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-053.html). The awardees are acknowledged for their promising science at the SPR Awards Luncheon at the annual PAS Meeting.

National SPR is able to support one PAS travel award per regional society. SPR Regional Society Leadership may nominate eligible candidates from their regional society by sending a brief description of the awardee and her/his associated science. Required information:

  • Awardee’s Name.
  • Awardee’s Email.
  • Name of the award the awardee was chosen for in your society.
  • Brief description of the awardee and his/her associated science.
  • Photo of the awardee.
  • Under-represented designation (refer to NIH description for categories).

Young Investigator Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

The prestigious Young Investigator Award was established by SPR in 1983. The award recognizes a rising star with outstanding scientific research accomplishments that help to unravel the mysteries of childhood development or disease.

Criteria:

  • Must have completed no more than 7 years post-training at the time of PAS 2018 Meeting (residency, post-doctoral or research fellowship).
  • Nominators of candidates who have completed more than 7 years of post-training due to interruption in research careers may request that committee waive stipulation.
  • Must not hold rank higher than Assistant Professor or equivalent.
  • Individuals with M.D. and/or Ph.D. are encouraged to apply.
  • Research work must have been conducted after graduation from medical school or completion of Ph.D.
  • Nominations must be made by a member of at least one of the Societies or Alliances comprise the Pediatric Academic Societies.
  • The Committee for the Young Investigator Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Member of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nomination.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for up to 4 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $2,000 at the PAS 2018 Meeting. Awardee will give lecture following presentation.
  • The Committee for the Young Investigator Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.

Nomination Requirements

  • Curriculum Vitae of Nominee
  • Manuscript of Research Work
    • Description of research work, the basis for the nomination.
    • Present in form of preprint or reprint of manuscripts representing fundamental research.
    • Maximum of 3 key papers reflecting research accomplished during post-training period.
  • Nominator’s Letter of Support
    • Must include detailed explanation of applicant’s role in research submitted.
    • Succinct and limited to 2 pages.
  • Senior Investigator Letter of Support (if other than Nominator)
    • Should be from an investigator from the laboratory where nominee carried out research submitted.
    • Include dates, department and location of research conducted there.
  • 3-5 additional Letters of Support
    • Letters should be from established investigators in the nominee’s field.
    • Provide critical evaluation of research work submitted for award.
    • Nominator should screen letters.
    • Limit to 2 pages for each letter.

Young Investigator Coaching Program

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

The SPR Young Investigator Coaching Program offers promising new pediatric researchers with mentoring opportunities from established national leaders in related research fields. Through this highly selective program, SPR strategically fosters development of successful early-career physician scientists and advances SPR’s mission to build a network of multi-disciplinary researchers to improve child health.

Eligibility for Mentees: 

  • Actively conducting child or adolescent health research.
  • Must have advanced doctoral degree in any child health related field (medicine, psychology, nursing, social work, nutrition).
  • Must be in the first 3 years of faculty appointment (Instructor, Assistant Professor or equivalent).
  • Intends to pursue an academic pediatric career with major focus on investigator-initiated research.
  • Must attend upcoming PAS Meeting .
  • All applicants are invited to apply. Individuals from groups identified by NIH as underrepresented in biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences such as Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander and Women as well as individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.
  • Applicants are encouraged to apply for membership in the SPR Junior Section if eligible.

Criteria for Selection

  • Potential for candidate to succeed as an academic investigator.
  • Commitment of candidate to pediatric research-oriented career.
  • Benefit provided to candidate by mentoring and support by YICP.
  • Availability of adequate mentoring at candidate’s institution.

Application Requirements

  • Descriptions of
    • Area of Expertise – 2-3 sentences.
    • Research Accomplishments – 150 words max.
    • Career Goals and Objectives – 150 words max.
    • Specific Aim of Current Research – 450 words max.
    • Why is external mentoring important and in what areas? – 150 words max.
  • List of Past and Current Mentors
    • Include name and title.
    • Include institution and project title/description.
  • List of Mentors at My Institution Available to Me
    • Include name and title.
    • Include institution and project title/description.
  • List of Mentors Elsewhere Who I Think Would Appropriate Coaches for Me
    • Include name and title.
    • Include institution and project title/description.
  • Letter of Support from Division Head or Department Chair addressing:
    • What the applicant is lacking in their environment in regards to mentoring.
    • How external mentoring provided by this program would be beneficial.
  • Applicant’s NIH Biosketch

European Young Investigator Exchange

This exchange program is an opportunity for the SPR to enhance its relationship with the European Society for Pediatric Research (ESPR) by fostering collaboration and providing educational exchange between the organizations. This program offers the opportunity for one ESPR young investigator to present his/her research at the annual Pediatric Academic (PAS) Meeting.  The candidate is selected by the ESPR to attend the PAS Meeting where he/she will be acknowledged for his/her accomplishment which includes receiving an award and presenting research to leaders within pediatric academics. In exchange, SPR will select one of its Fellow Research Awardees to attend the annual ESPR Meeting.

Japan Fellow Exchange

This exchange program is an opportunity for the SPR to enhance its relationship with the Japan Pediatric Society (JPS) by fostering collaboration and providing educational exchange between the organizations. This program offers opportunities for JPS young investigators to present their research at the annual Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting.  Each year, three young investigators are selected by the JPS to attend the PAS Meeting where they will be acknowledged for their accomplishments which includes receiving an award and presenting research to leaders within pediatric academics.

Japan SPR Fostering Leadership Program

The Japanese Pediatric Society (JPS) and the Society for Pediatric Research (SPR) have a long tradition of fostering programs that support research and career developments in pediatrics across borders. To expand the exposure of JPS physician scientists to include post-doctoral research opportunities in US-based laboratories, and thus foster development of research and leadership skills that will promote their future career success in pediatric research and leadership roles in Japan, the JPS and SPR partnered on a new initiative to support qualified candidates proposed by JPS to be hosted by US-based laboratories for post-doctoral training in a field related to pediatrics.

SPR Abstract Related Awards and Funding

House Officer Research Award

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors house officers engaged in pediatric research. These awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work presented in the abstract. Each awardee will receive a $1,000 award. One to three awards will be given.

Eligibility Criteria: House Officer must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of residency.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • Applicant must be a House Officer or Resident.
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract at the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of residency.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Meeting to be considered.
  • Letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of the abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

Student Research Award

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors students engaged in pediatric research. These awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work presented in the abstract. Each awardee will receive a $1,000 award. Three to six awards will be given; one to two in each of the categories below:

  • D./Ph.D. and Ph.D. Students:
    Eligibility Criteria: Student must submit and present abstract prior to the student receiving his/her M.D./Ph.D. or Ph.D. degree
  • Medical Students
    Eligibility Criteria: Student must submit and present abstract prior to the student receiving his/her M.D. degree.
  • High School and College Students
    Eligibility Criteria: Student must submit and present abstract prior to the student receiving his/her B.S./B.A degree.
  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Meeting to be considered.
  • Letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of the abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

PAS Meeting Travel Grant Program

Grants must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The Pediatric Academic Societies will award travel grants in the amount of $500 plus complimentary meeting registration to attend the PAS Annual Meeting. Travel grants are possible to runner-ups among the Fellow’s Basic & Clinical Research Award categories only. Indicate your interest by checking the PAS Travel Grant box in the online abstract submission program.

SPR and APS Joint Award

Mary Ellen Avery Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

In 2013, the APS and SPR established and endowed the Mary Ellen Avery Award.  This award honors Dr. Avery’s outstanding lifetime achievements and seminal contributions to neonatal health through her discovery of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), her research and academic leadership, and her outstanding service to pediatrics and neonatology.

With this award the APS and SPR seek to recognize a pediatric investigator who has made important contributions to neonatal health through basic or translational research.

Eligibility:

  • Pediatric investigator with a sustained record of excellence as a neonatal health investigator.
  • Record of substantive:
    • Neonatal health research contributions.
    • Impact on the field.
    • National and international recognition.

Nomination:

  • Detailed Letter of Nomination*.
  • Three Letters of Support*.
  • Letters should provide ample evidence of a Nominee’s substantive:
    • Neonatal health research contributions.
    • Impact on the field.
    • National and international recognition.
  • Nominee curriculum vitae with bibliography of published works.
    • An asterisk (*) should identify the five papers that the Nominee’s regards as his/her most significant contributions.
    • Research productivity by the Nominee’s mentees should be indicated by highlighting the names of these individuals in each publication.

* Note:  The Nominator may not also author a Letter of Support.  Members of the Selection Committee may not nominate or support nominations.

Selection:

  • The Committee for the Mary Ellen Avery Award is solely responsible for selection.
  • Selection is made February 2019.

Award: 

  • Scientific presentation (15-minutes) at PAS Meeting session.
  • $1,000 honorarium and plaque presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting.
  • Complimentary PAS Meeting registration.
  • Economy airfare to PAS Meeting, if booked 30 days in advance.
  • Two-nights at PAS hotel, if booked 30 days in advance.
  • Awardee will be invited to serve on the Selection Committee

FOPO Award

Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award

The Federation of Pediatric Organizations (FOPO) is composed of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Academic Pediatric Association, American Pediatric Society, American Board of Pediatrics, Association of Medical School Pediatric Department Chairs, Association of Pediatric Program Directors, and Society for Pediatric Research. The purpose of FOPO is to promote optimal health for children by building on the efforts and expertise of the member organizations, and on the relationships between the member organizations to accomplish shared goals.

The Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award was created in honor of Dr. St. Geme to recognize a pediatrician who is a role model for others to emulate as a clinician, an educator, and/or an investigator. Recipients of this award have had a record of broad and sustained contributions to pediatrics that have had or will have a major impact on child health. Most importantly, the award recognizes those individuals who have “created a future” within the field.

The criteria for the selection of the Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr., MD Leadership Award recipient are as follows:

The individual must be a pediatrician who is perceived as a role model for others to emulate, as a clinician, an educator, and/or an investigator.

  • The individual must be a leader who has “created a future” for pediatrics and for children and has played an active role in one or more organizations sponsoring this award.
  • The individual should preferably have a record of broad sustained contributions to pediatrics that have had or will have a major impact on child health.
  • The individual must be currently active in pediatrics.

The individual can be a retired member of any of the pediatric organizations sponsoring this award.

Additional Information

Fellows’ Basic Research Awards

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors fellows engaged in pediatric basic research. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work (basic research) presented in the abstract.  Each of these awards carries a monetary prize of $1,000.  All awardees are chosen from the general category of SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Awards.

The SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. There is a maximum of 6 awards given from this category:

  • 3 Basic Research Awards
  • 1 David G. Nathan Award
  • 2 additional Basic Research Awards, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section

Fellows’ Basic Research Award (3 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

Eligibility Criteria for Awards: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

David G. Nathan Award in Basic Research (1 award given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR David G. Nathan Award in Basic Research by a Fellow was established in 2000 by the colleagues, trainees, and friends of Dr. Nathan to honor his achievements in every aspect of academic pediatrics. The winning candidate is chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Award applicants whose abstract has been accepted for a platform session.

Eligibility Criteria: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

SPR Basic Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section (2 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR Basic Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section was established in 2013.  The winning candidates are chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Award Applicants, in addition, must be a member of the SPR Junior Section membership.

Eligibility Criteria: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

Fellows’ Clinical Research Awards

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors fellows engaged in pediatric clinical research. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work (clinical or translational research) presented in the abstract.  Each of these awards carries a monetary prize of $1,000.  All awardees are chosen from the general category of SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Awards applications.

The SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. There is a maximum of 6 awards given from this category:

  • 3 Clinical Research Awards
  • 1 Richard D. Rowe Award
  • 2 additional Clinical Research Awards, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section

Fellows’ Clinical Research Award (3 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

Eligibility Criteria for Awards: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • Applicant must be a Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify).
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be clinical or translational research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the Pediatric Academic Societies’ (PAS) Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Annual Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

Richard D. Rowe Award in Clinical Research (1 award given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR Richard D. Rowe Award for Clinical Research by a Fellow was established in 1988 by the colleagues, trainees, and friends of Dr. Rowe to honor his many personal achievements, commitment to academic excellence, integrity and humility.  The winning candidate is chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Award applicants whose abstract has been accepted for a platform session.

Eligibility Criteria: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

SPR Clinical Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section (2 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR Clinical Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section was established in 2013.  The winning candidate is chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Award Applicants, in addition, must be a member of the SPR Junior Section membership.

Eligibility Criteria for Awards: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • Applicant must be a Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify).
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be clinical or translational research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the Pediatric Academic Societies’ (PAS) Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Annual Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

SPR Awards Recipients

Maureen Andrew Mentor Award

Ed Bell, MD

Dr. Bell is Professor and Vice Chair for Faculty Development in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Iowa, where he has served on the faculty since completing his neonatology training in 1979. He received his MD from Columbia University. He completed pediatric residency at Babies Hospital followed by neonatology fellowships at McMaster University Medical Centre and Brown University.

Dr. Bell served as Director of the Division of Neonatology at Iowa for 17 years before becoming Vice Chair of Pediatrics in 2005. He has conducted research on the care and outcomes of premature infants and serves as principal investigator for the University of Iowa center in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network.

Dr. Bell has had extensive mentoring experience throughout his career. He has mentored undergraduate, PhD, and medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty members. Among his former mentees are 2 current or former department chairs, 3 vice chairs, 7 division chiefs, a chief medical officer, several medical directors, the Command Surgeon of the U.S. Army Training Command, and 12 full professors. Of his 202 papers published in peer-reviewed journals, 86 included 126 authors who were trainees.

As Vice Chair for Faculty Development in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Iowa, he provides career monitoring and mentorship to the department’s entire faculty of more than 150. He developed a very successful formal mentoring program for the junior faculty members in the department.

Dr. Bell has made several international teaching tours each year throughout his career. He has also helped to arrange visits to Iowa for more than 100 international physicians and nurses for periods of 1 week to 2 years. In recognition of his excellence as a mentor, Dr. Bell received the 2002 Humanism in Medicine Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, and he will be the 2019 recipient of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Distinguished Mentor Award.

Society for Pediatric Research Award in Honor of E. Mead Johnson

Joshua D. Milner, MD

Joshua Milner is the chief of the Laboratory of Allergic Diseases and the Genetics and Pathogenesis of Allergy Section within the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the NIH in Bethesda, MD. He graduated from MIT, received his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, trained in pediatrics at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC and in allergy and immunology at the NIAID in Bethesda, MD through the Pediatric Scientist Development Program fellowship mentored by Dr. William E. Paul. His laboratory conducts basic, translational and clinical research revolving around the identification and study of congenital syndromes which have allergy as a major phenotype, a set of disorders his group has termed Primary Atopic Disorders. These have included cold-urticaria-associated PLCG2-associated Antibody deficiency and Immune Dysregulation (PLAID), PGM3 Deficiency, Hereditary Alpha Tryptasemia Syndrome (HATs), CARD11-associated Atopy with Dominant Interference of NF-κB Signaling (CADINS) and others. His lab has identified and studied other immune dysregulatory disorders as well such as STAT3 gain of function mutations in multisystem autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation. The goal of identifying and studying these disorders is both to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic options for patients with such rare diseases, and to identify pathways and interventions fundamental to allergic disease in general. He is a recipient of the PhARF award for allergy research (Uppsala University, Sweden), the Gail and Ira Drukier Prize in Children’s Health Research (Cornell University), and is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians.

Outstanding New Member Science Award

Elizabeth Barnert, MD, MPH, MS

Elizabeth Barnert, MD, MPH, MS is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Dr. Barnert’s clinical work is in general pediatrics. A Cuban-American raised in Los Angeles, she is passionate about improving health outcomes of vulnerable youth, especially Latino children and adolescents. Dr. Barnert’s research focuses on youth involved in the juvenile justice system, commercially sexually exploited youth, and youth undergoing family separation and reunification.

Funded through an NIH Career Development Award, Dr. Barnert is partnering with Los Angeles County to develop and test an intervention to link youth to mental health and substance use treatment services after juvenile detention.

Dr. Barnert serves as an advisor to the California state legislature and to US Congress on juvenile justice policy. Her research contributed to the passage of California SB 1322, which decriminalized child victims of commercial sexual exploitation; to AB 2992, which requires police officer training on commercial sexual exploitation of youth; and SB 439, which excludes children 11 and under from the juvenile justice system.

Dr. Barnert’s work is guided by the principle that all children should receive the support they need to be healthy and thrive.

Christian Capitini, MD

Christian Capitini, M.D., joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in 2011, and is presently an American Cancer Society Research Scholar and a Young Investigator on a Pediatric Cancer Dream Team sponsored by the St. Baldrick’s Foundation and Stand up to Cancer. Dr. Capitini leads an NIH and NSF-supported laboratory focusing on development of cell-based therapies for the treatment of childhood cancers like neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma, including NK cells and CAR T cells. His laboratory was the first to track NK cells within tumors using fluorine-19 MRI. The laboratory also manufactures cell-based therapies for complications of bone marrow transplant, including alternatively activated macrophages to treat graft-versus-host-disease and acute radiation syndrome. In the clinic, Dr. Capitini was a site Principal Investigator for multiple CAR T cell trials for the treatment of childhood leukemia.

Physician Scientist Award: Bridging to Success

Teresa Kortz, MD

Dr. Teresa Kortz was born and raised in Nevada and attended the University of Washington, earning degrees in Spanish Language and Literature and Neurobiology before graduating cum laude in 2004. She remained at the University of Washington to pursue her medical degree in the global health track and graduated in 2008 with honors. She then attended Stanford University, completing both a pediatric residency and critical care fellowship. During critical care fellowship, Dr. Kortz was the PI on a retrospective cohort study of children with sepsis in Bangladesh measuring mortality before and after implementation of a pediatric protocol based on Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Following that experience, Dr. Kortz complete the Masters in Global Health Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) to build further skills in clinical research and refine her global health knowledge, during which she explored the cost-effectiveness of bubble CPAP in Malawi. In 2015, Dr. Kortz became junior faculty at the UCSF in the Division of Critical Care and in 2018, still on faculty, she enrolled in the Global Health Sciences PhD program in the Clinical Research Track at UCSF. Her current work is in sub-Saharan Africa studying pediatric sepsis and severe febrile illness. She is currently the co- chair of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Global Health subgroup and is leading a global study to measure the point prevalence of pediatric critical care in resource-limited settings. Dr. Kortz’s overall career goal is to develop evidence-based, context-relevant pediatric interventions for resource-limited settings that improve child health outcomes.

Physician Scientist Runner-Up Award

Anthony Orvedahl, MD

I am an Instructor in the Division of Infectious Diseases in the Department of Pediatrics at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. My research interests are in the regulation of host inflammatory responses, specifically how cellular homeostasis is maintained under stress to achieve optimal immunity. My work with co-mentors, Dr. Herbert “Skip” Virgin and Dr. Gary Silverman, specifically seeks to understand how autophagy — a process in which cellular contents are delivered lysosomes for degradation — promotes cell survival during cytokine responses. We found using genome-wide CRISPR screening that autophagy genes protect myeloid cells against cell death triggered by IFN-gamma. This cell death process also requires the TNF cytokine and mediators downstream of TNF-receptor such as RIPK1 and CASP8. Moreover, mice that lack autophagy genes in their myeloid cells succumb more readily to TNF-induced shock. Current efforts are aimed at deciphering the mechanism of cell death in vitro and in vivo, and, since TNF is insufficient on it’s own to induced death, evaluating novel IFNgamma induced mediators in this system. My clinical interests in Pediatric Infectious Diseases relate to emerging viral infections, immunocompromised patients, and sepsis.

In my free time I enjoy spending time with my wife and 4- year old son, cooking and bike riding, visiting the many restaurants, museums, and attractions in the St. Louis area, and traveling to new places.

Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce

TBD

Young Investigator Award

Stephen W. Patrick, MD, MPH, MS

Stephen W. Patrick, MD, MPH, MS, is the Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy, an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and an attending neonatologist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. He also currently serves as an Adjunct Physician Policy Research at RAND Corporation and is a Guest Researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is a graduate of the University of Florida, Florida State University College of Medicine and Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Patrick completed his training in pediatrics, neonatology and health services research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Patrick’s National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded research focuses on improving outcomes for opioid-exposed infants and women with opioid use disorder and evaluating state and federal drug control policies. He previously served as Senior Science Policy Advisor to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. Dr. Patrick is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Use and Prevention and has been a voting member on several US Food and Drug Administration Advisory Boards focused on opioid use in children. He has testified about the impact of the opioid epidemic on pregnant women and infants before committees in both the US House of Representatives and the US Senate. Dr. Patrick’s awards include the American Medical Association Foundation Excellence in Medicine Leadership Award, the Academic Pediatric Association Fellow Research Award, Tennessee Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics Early Career Physician of the Year, the Nemours Child Health Services Research Award and the Society for Pediatric Research Young Investigator Award. His research has been published in leading scientific journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Pediatrics and Health Affairs.

SPR and APS Joint Award Recipient

Mary Ellen Avery Neonatal Research Award

Roberta Ballard, MD
University of California
Department of Pediatrics

Philip Ballard, MD, PhD
University of California
Department of Pediatrics

Roberta A Ballard is Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, and Emeritus Professor and of Pediatrics and Ob/Gyne at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.Roberta received her MD at the University of Chicago and her residency training in pediatrics at the University of Chicago and Stanford and fellowship in Neonatal Perinatal medicine at George Washington University Hospital and the Cardiovascular Research Institute (CVRI) at UCSF. In 1972 Roberta became Chief of the NICU at Mt. Zion Hospital San Francisco and later became Chief of the Pediatric program and pediatric residency and developed a neonatal fellowship training program in collaboration with UCSF and the CVRI over the next 19 years. Subsequently she, along with her husband Phil Ballard MD PhD led the neonatology program at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania for 15 years as Chief and Director of Research, respectively. They were jointly awarded the PAS Maureen Andrew Mentoring award in 2013 in recognition of mentoring activities over their careers. Roberta has been involved in developing and directing all aspects of NIH-funded multi-center clinical trials in the neonate over more than 25 years and has been funded for multi-center randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the prevention of the Chronic Lung Disease of prematurity (Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, BPD) since 1991. She was PI of the NICHD-funded antenatal TRH trial which demonstrated that the addition of TRH to antenatal glucocorticoid does not improve respiratory outcome, ending use of that combination in perinatal practice. Subsequently she was PI of the NHLBI-funded NO CLD trial, which demonstrated a dosing approach for inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) therapy that is safe and effective in improving survival without BPD in some high risk ventilated infants and improving their pulmonary outcome through 1 year of age. She was PI of a NHLBI funded multi-center trial (25 sites) examining the combination of iNO with late doses of surfactant (TOLSURF) and assessing pulmonary and neurodevelopmental outcome through age 2. She is currently involved in a pilot dose escalation study of budesonide in surfactant to prevent BPD. Her research has been done as “bench to bedside” work with her collaborator of more than 40 years – Dr. Philip L. Ballard. Philip Ballard is Professor of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, and Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He graduated from Earlham College (Indiana) and obtained his MD and PhD in biochemistry from the University of Chicago. After Pediatric residency training at Stanford and UCSF and postgraduate science at NIH, he joined Pediatrics and the CVRI as a faculty member in 1972. Together with Roberta Ballard, Phil developed a neonatal fellowship training program at Mt. Zion Hospital San Francisco in collaboration with UCSF Neonatology and the CVRI over the next 19 years. Subsequently, they led the neonatology program at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania for 15 years as Chief and Director of Research, respectively. The Ballards were jointly awarded the Pediatric Academic Society’s Maureen Andrew Mentoring award in 2013 in recognition of mentoring activities over their careers. Phil pursued a research career in lung developmental biology within Neonatology and has been continuously funded by the NIH for 45 years. His laboratory provided early evidence regarding the mechanism of glucocorticoids to accelerate fetal lung maturation, profiled and characterized lung genes that are hormonally regulated, studied surfactant biosynthesis and function, and investigated inherited disorders of surfactant. In translational studies associated with trials of glucocorticoids, thyrotropin releasing hormone, inhaled nitric oxide and late surfactant therapy in premature infants, his laboratory in collaboration with Roberta Ballard’s clinical team established circulating levels of betamethasone and documented in vivo biological responses to the different interventions that have been studied for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Recently, he has examined anti-inflammatory responses to
budesonide both in vitro and in animals using surfactant as a delivery vehicle and has initiated genomic, proteomic and metabolic studies of premature infants. Currently, Phil and Roberta are continuing their long-term collaboration with ongoing data analysis, clinical trial design, and pilot trials.

FOPO Award Recipient

Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award

F. Bruder Stapleton, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital

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SPR Abstract Related Awards and Funding Recipients

House Officer Research Award

TBD

Student Research Award

TBD

Japan Pediatric Society Fellow Exchange Award

Tomonori Kadowaki, MD
Matsue Red Cross Hospital

Akihiko Miyauchi, MD
Jichi Medical University


Nobuyuki Tsujii
Nara Medical University

European Society for Pediatric Research Young Investigator Award

Anne Smits
University Hospitals Leuven
Belgium

Fellows’ Basic Research Award (3 awards given annually)

TBD

David G. Nathan in Basic Research Award (1 award given annually)

TBD

Basic Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior Section (2 awards given annually)

TBD

Fellow’s Clinical Research Award (3 awards given annually)

TBD

Richard D. Rowe Award in Clinical Research (1 award given annually)

TBD

Fellows’ Clinical Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior Section ( 2 awards given annually)

TBD

Past Award Recipients

Maureen Andrew Mentor Award

  • 2018 | Jeff Fineman, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2017 | Michael R. DeBaun, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2016 | Diana W. Bianchi, Floating Hospital for Children, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • 2015 | Steven H. Abman, Children’s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, Aurora CO
  • 2014 | Kathryn M. Edwards, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2013 | Roberta and Philip Ballard, UCSF, CA
  • 2012 | William Oh, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI
  • 2011 | David K. Stevenson, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA
  • 2010 | Norman David Rosenblum, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
  • 2009 | Jon E. Tyson, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX
  • 2008 | Sherin U. Devaskar, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
  • 2007 | Ron G. Rosenfeld, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, Palo Alto, CA
  • 2006 | Donna M. Ferriero, University of California, San Francisco, CA
  • 2005 | Edward R. B. McCabe, University of California, Los Angeles, CA
  • 2004 | George Lister, Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX
  • 2003 | Arnold L. Smith, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, Seattle, WA

Mary Ellen Avery Award (SPR and APS Joint Award)

  • 2018 | Richard Martin, MD
  • 2017 | Alan H. Jobe, MD, PhD
  • 2016 | Steven H. Abman, MD
  • 2015 | Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD
  • 2014 | John A. Clements, MD

Thomas A. Hazinski Distinguished Service Award

  • 2018 |Kate Ackerman, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • 2017 | Vivek Balasubramanian, University of Wisconsin/American Family Children’s Hospital, Madison, WI
  • 2016 | Kate Culliton, APS/SPR Central Office, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2015 | Catherine Gordon, Hasbro Children’s Hospital and Brown University, Providence, RI
    and Barbara Anagnostelis, APS/SPR Central Office, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2014 | Thomas P. Shanley, MICHR, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 2013 | Elena Fuentes-Afflick, University of California, San Francisco, CA
  • 2012 | Jana M. Wells, SPR Central Office, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2011 | Charles V. (Skip) Smith, Seattle Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Seattle, WA
  • 2010 | Alan H. Jobe, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • 2009 | Gail Demmler-Harrison, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
  • 2008 | Karen Hendricks, Washington, DC
  • 2007 | Kathy A. Cannon, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2006 | Thomas Hazinski, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2005 | Samuel Hawgood, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco, CA
  • 2004 | Thomas N. Hansen, Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
  • 2003 | Myron Genel, Yale University, New Haven, CT
  • 2002 | Debbie Anagnostelis, The Woodlands, TX

Society for Pediatric Research Award in honor of E. Mead Johnson

  • 2018 | Helen Su, M.D., Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • 2017 | Jordan S. Orange, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
  • 2016 | Kimberly Stegmaier, Boston Children’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Sing Sing Way, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH
  • 2015 | Ophir David Klein, University of California, San Francisco, CA
    Loren D. Walensky, Children’s Hospital – Boston / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2014 | Atul Butte, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
    John Vance Williams, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2013 | William T. Pu, Children’s Hospital Boston, MA
    Bradley L. Schlaggar, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • 2012 | Scott Armstrong, Harvard Medical School, Children’s Hospital Boston, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
    Nicholas Katsanis, Duke University, Durham, NC
  • 2011 | Joel Hirschhorn, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA
    Eric Vilain, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, CA
  • 2010 | Jean-Laurent Casanova, The Rockefeller University Hospital, New York, New York
    Fernando Pedro Polack, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • 2009 | George Q. Daley, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
    Brendan Lee, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • 2008 |Todd R. Golub, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
    Victor Nizet, University of California, San Diego & Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
  • 2007 | Marc E. Rothenberg, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
    Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA
  • 2006 |James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
    David Pellman, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MD
  • 2005 |Elizabeth C. Engle, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA
    Terence R. Flotte, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • 2004 |Bruce D. Gelb, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
    Friedhelm Hildebrandt, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 2003 | Gregory S. Barsh, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
    Val C. Sheffield, University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • 2002 | Nancy C. Andrews, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
    Markus Grompe, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland
  • 2001 | Alan D. D’Andrea, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
    Steve A.N. Goldstein, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • 2000 | Mark A. Kay, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
    Gregg L. Semenza, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • 1999 | Steven H. Abman, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
    Chaim M. Roifman, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
  • 1998 | Jonathan D. Gitlin, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
    James R. Lupski, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    Jeffrey C. Murray, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City
  • 1997 | Donald Y.M. Leung, National Jewish Center for Immunology & Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO
    Elaine Tuomanen, St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN
  • 1996 | Perrin C. White, U.T. Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
    Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • 1995 | Margaret K. Hostetter, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
    Alan M. Krensky, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • 1994 | David A. Williams, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis
    David H. Perlmutter, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • 1993 | Edward R.B. McCabe, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    Alan L. Schwartz, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
  • 1992 | Ann Margaret Arvin, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA
    Francis S. Collins, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor
    Lap-Chee Tsui, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada on University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • 1991 | Louis M. Kunkel, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Ronald G. Worton, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • 1990 | Gregory A. Grabowski, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York
    Arnold W. Strauss, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • 1989 | Steven M. Reppert, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Robert H. Yolken, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MA
  • 1988 | Jeffrey A. Whitsett, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
    Barry Wolf, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond
  • 1987 | Donald C. Anderson, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    Stuart H. Orkin, The Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • 1986 | Raif Salim Geha, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Alan H. Jobe, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance
  • 1985 | Russell W. Chesney, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison
    Augustine Joseph D’Ercole, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • 1984 | Jan L. Breslow, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    John A. Phillips, III, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1983 | Laurence A. Boxer, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor
    Samuel E. Lux, IV, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1982 | Larry J. Shapiro, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Campus, Torrance
    Jerry A. Winkelstein, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
  • 1981 | Robert J. Desnick, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York
    Erwin W. Gelfand, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
  • 1980 | R. Michael Blaese, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    S. Michael Mauer, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • 1979 | Philip L. Ballard, University of California, San Francisco
    Harvey R. Colten, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • 1978 | Samuel A. Latt, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Pearay L. Ogra, State University of New York at Buffalo
  • 1977 | Arthur J. Ammann, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco
    Michael E. Miller, UCLA School of Medicine, Torrance
  • 1976 | Haig H. Kazazian, Jr., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    David Lawrence Rimoin, UCLA School of Medicine, Torrance
  • 1975 | John B. Robbins, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    David H. Smith, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Rawle M. McIntosh, University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver
  • 1974 | Andre J. Nahmias, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
    E. Richard Stiehm, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles
  • 1973 | Henry L. Nadler, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
    James G. White, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis
  • 1972 | Chester M. Edelmann, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
    Frank A. Oski, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • 1971 | Paul G. Quie, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
    Fred S. Rosen, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • 1970 | Myron Winick, New York Hospital, Cornell Medical Center, New York
    Joseph A. Bellanti, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC
  • 1969 | Frederick C. Battaglia, University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver
    Gerard B. Odell, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
  • 1968 | Mary Ellen Avery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
    Charles R. Scriver, Montreal Children’s Hospital, Montreal, Canada
  • 1967 | Henry Neil Kirkman, Jr., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Henry M. Meyer, Jr., National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    Paul D. Parkman, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • 1966 | William H. Tooley, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco
    Robert W. Winters, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
  • 1965 | David Y.-Y Hsia, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL
    L. Stanley James, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
  • 1964 | Robert M. Chanock, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    Abraham M. Rudolph, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
  • 1963 | D. Carleton Gajdusek, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    Richard T. Smith, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville
  • 1962 | Park S. Gerald, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Robert L. Vernier, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis
  • 1961 | Lytt Irvine Gardner, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, NY
    Donald E. Pickering, University of Oregon Medical School, Portland
  • 1960 | Robert A. Aldrich, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
    Irving Schulman, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL
  • 1959 | C. Henry Kempe, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
    Barton Childs, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1958 | William A. Silverman, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
    Norman Kretchmer, Cornell University Medical College, New York
  • 1957 | Alfred M. Bongiovanni, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
    Walter R. Eberlein, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
    Albert Dorfman, University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
  • 1956 | David Gitlin, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Arnall Patz, District of Columbia General Hospital and Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD
  • 1955 | Robert A. Good, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis
  • 1954 | Robert E. Cooke, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
    Vincent C. Kelley, University of Utah College of Medicine, Salt Lake City
  • 1953 | Frederick C. Robbins, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
    Thomas H. Weller, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Margaret H. Smith, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA
  • 1952 | Seymour S. Cohen, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
    Orvar Swenson, Tufts College Medical School, Boston, MA
    Edward B.D. Neuhauser, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1951 | William M. Wallace, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Victor A. Najjar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1950 | Charles D. May, State University of Iowa, Iowa City
    Harry Shwachman, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MD
    Gertrude Henle, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
    Werner Henle, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • 1949 | Nathan B. Talbot, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Henry L. Barnett, Cornell University Medical College, New York
  • 1948 | Wolf W. Zuelzer, Wayne University College of Medicine, Detroit, MI
    Benjamin M. Spock, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, NY
  • 1947 | Helen B. Taussig, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Louis K. Diamond, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1946 | Horace L. Hodes, Sydenham Hospital, Baltimore, MD
    Paul A. Harper, Medical Corps, United States Army
  • 1944 | Fuller Albright, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1943 | Hattie E. Alexander, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
    Philip Levine, Newark, NJ
  • 1942 | David Bodian, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Howard A. Howe, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Harold E. Harrison, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Helen C. Harrison, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1941 | René J. Dubos, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York
    Albert S. Sabin, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
  • 1940 | Robert E. Gross, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Lee E. Farr, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York
  • 1939 | Frederic A. Gibbs, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Dorothy H. Anderson, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York

Douglas K. Richardson Award

  • 2018 | Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA
  • 2017 | Roger F. Soll, University of Vermont Burlington, VT
  • 2016 | Shoo K. Lee, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada
  • 2015 | Waldemar A. Carlo, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL
  • 2014 | Mark A. Schuster, Boston Children’s Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2013 | Betty R. Vohr, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, RI
  • 2012 | Sten H. Vermund, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Nashville, TN
  • 2011 | Saroj Saigal, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
  • 2010 | Jeffrey B. Gould, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA
  • 2009 | Gary L. Freed, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 2008 | Ruth E.K. Stein, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Boston, NY
  • 2007 | M. Jeffrey Maisels, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI
  • 2006 | Marie C. McCormick, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
  • 2005 | Maureen Hack, Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • 2004 | Jon E. Tyson, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, Houston, TX
  • 2003 | Murray M. Pollack, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC

Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award (FOPO Award)

  • 2018 | Mark Schuster, MD, PHD, FAAP
  • 2017 | Carol Carraccio, MD
  • 2016 | David Kendall Stevenson, MD
  • 2015 | Barry Zuckerman, MD
  • 2014 | Lewis First, MD
  • 2013 | Renee Jenkin’s, MD
  • 2012 | Gail McGuinness, MD
  • 2011 | George Lister, MD
  • 2010 | Stephen Ludwig, MD
  • 2009 | Kenneth Roberts, MD
  • 2008 | Douglas Jones, MD
  • 2007 | Richard Behrman, MD
  • 2006 | Carol Berkowitz, MD
  • 2005 | Robert Kelch, MD
  • 2004 | Myron Genel, MD
  • 2003 | Thomas Boat, MD
  • 2002 | Walter Tunnessen, MD
  • 2001 | Russell Chesney, MD
  • 2000 | Evan Charney, MD
  • 1999 | James Stockman, MD
  • 1998 | Catherine DeAngelis, MD
  • 1997 | Errol Alden, MD
  • 1996 | Jimmy Simon, MD
  • 1995 | Ralph Feigin, MD
  • 1994 | Vincent Fulginiti, MD
  • 1993 | Abraham Rudolph, MD
  • 1992 | Morris Green, MD
  • 1991 | Lewis Barness, MD
  • 1990 | Frank Oski, MD
  • 1989 | Robert Haggerty, MD
  • 1988 | Sam Katz, MD

Outstanding New Member Science Award

  • 2018 | Katherine Y. King, MD, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    Indi Trehan, MD, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Physician Scientist Award: Bridging to Success

  • 2018 | Elizabeth Bhoj, MD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
  • 2017 | Sagori Mukhopadhyay, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce

  • 2018 | Viviana Fajardo, Western Society for Pediatric Research
    Suhasini Kaushal, Eastern Society for Pediatric Research
    Rolando Macias, Southern Society for Pediatric Research
    Courtney Rowan, Midwest Society for Pediatric Research
  • 2017 | Rakhee M. Bowker, Midwest Society for Pediatric Research
    Christiana N. Oji-Mmuo, Eastern Society for Pediatric Research
    Ariel A. Salas, Southern Society for Pediatric Research
    Tracylyn Yellowhair, Western Society for Pediatric Research

Young Investigator Award

  • 2018 | Alex Kentsis, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, NY
  • 2017 | Daniel E. Bauer, Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • 2016 | Jeffrey D. Dvorin, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2015 | Vijay G, Sankaran, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2014 | Sallie R. Permar, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
  • 2013 | Heather Mefford, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • 2012 | Kimberly Stegmaier, Children’s Hospital Boston, MA
  • 2011 | Juliane Bubeck Wardenburg, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • 2010 | Atul J. Butte, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • 2009 | Loren Walensky, Harvard Medical School / Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • 2008 | Brian Jay Feldman, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2007 | Michael J. Ackerman, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • 2006 | Fernando Pedro Polack, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • 2005 | Anne Marguerite Moon, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT
  • 2004 | Joel N. Hirschhorn, Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2003 | Michael C.V. Jensen, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA
  • 2002 | Andrew Scharenberg, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
  • 2001 | James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • 2000 | Brendan Lee, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • 1999 | Louis J. Muglia, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • 1998 | Michael J. Bamshad, University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City
  • 1997 | Todd R. Golub, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1996 | Gary A. Herman, University of California, San Francisco
  • 1995 | Melissa Elder, University of California, San Francisco
  • 1994 | Nancy C. Andrews, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • 1993 | Harry C. Dietz, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1992 | Raymond G. Watts, University of Alabama, Birmingham
  • 1991 | Sally Radovick, Case Western Reserve, University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • 1990 | Alan D. D’Andrea, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1989 | Grant A. Mitchell, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
  • 1988 | Roger E. Breitbart, The Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • 1987 | Arthur L. Horwich, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • 1986 | Edward V. Prochownik, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 1985 | Alan M. Krensky, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA
  • 1984 | Stylianos E. Antonarakis, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1983 | Alan L. Schwartz, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA