SPR Awards

Maureen Andrew Mentor Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

Established in 2003, the Maureen Andrew Mentor Award honors the contributions of Dr. Maureen Andrew to the field of child health research. The award recognizes outstanding mentor leadership that generates excitement, creativity and scholarships leading to outstanding research and teaching.

Criteria: 

  • Must be a Pediatrician.
  • Must have a sustained record of excellence as a mentor, defined as an individual who demonstrates attributes of teacher, sponsor, guide, mentor, counselor.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • The recipient must attend the PAS Meeting.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for 2 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $1,000 during the PAS Meeting.
  • The Committee for the Maureen Andrew Mentor Award will be solely responsible for the selection of the recipients.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.

Nomination Requirements 

  • Current Curriculum Vitae of the Nominee
    • Include Supervisory/Mentor activities.
    • Research productivity by Mentees should be indicated by highlighting the names in each publication.
  • List of Mentees
    • Present as a spreadsheet or table.
    • Include the following: Training/Faculty level at time of mentorship, current academic appointment, indication as to whether mentees are currently recipients of operating grants awarded by NIH and/or non-governmental organizations, other academic leadership or research contributions (e.g. research awards).
  • List of Mentoring Activities (other than direct supervision of research)
    • Could include leadership within a training grant, development/implementation of mentoring activities at local, national or international level, mentoring activities within professional organizations and academic health science centers.
  • Letter of Nomination and 3 Letters of Support (4 letters total)
    • Letters should provide evidence regarding how nominee has displayed mentor-related attributes including sponsor, mentor, guide, role model and counselor.
    • Letters should include the impact of the nominee’s mentorship on the career development of those mentored.

Thomas A. Hazinski Distinguished Service

This award was established by the SPR Council in 2002 and honors a special individual who has provided exceptional service to the Society over an extended period of time.

Public recognition of the award will be during the SPR Presidential Plenary Session at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting.

Society for Pediatric Research Award in honor of E Mead Johnson

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

Since 1939, the SPR Award in honor of E. Mead Johnson has recognized outstanding clinical and laboratory pediatric research achievements. The most prestigious award presented by the SPR, this honor recognizes E. Mead Johnson’s legacy of research excellence and impact on child health that continues to inspire the pediatric community today.

Criteria:

  • Must have received first doctoral degree in 1999 or later. (Nominators of candidates who have interrupted their research career for 2 or more years may request that the committee waives this stipulation).
  • Must have displayed research contributions related to pediatrics published within recent years.
  • Strong record of independent research productivity.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for up to 4 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $12,500 during the PAS 2018 Meeting. Awardee will give lecture following presentation.
  • The Committee for the E. Mead Johnson Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.
  • Supported by Mead Johnson Nutrition.
  • Award winner will be under no obligation to Mead Johnson Nutrition.

Nomination Requirements 

  • Current Curriculum Vitae of the Nominee
    • Include bibliography of published works of nominee with an asterisk next to the most significant contributions.
    • Indicate record of research productivity.
  • Detailed Letter of Nomination
    • Originality of the research work.
    • Independent investigation or collaboration.
    • Soundness of investigation and value of research work in contributing basic knowledge to overall field of pediatrics Include references to literature where appropriate.
    • Include national and/or international recognition.
  • 2 Letters of Support
    • One letter should be outside of the nominee’s institution.
    • Letters should not be from a direct collaborator/co-author of the nominee.
  • 3 Recent Articles (within last 5 years)
    • Reflect nominee’s best work.
    • Selection of these works is a major point of evaluation.

Douglas K. Richardson Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

This award was established to honor Dr. Douglas K. Richardson’s contributions to child health services, perinatal and pediatric research, and the Society for Pediatric Research. The award honors the lifetime achievement of an investigator who has made substantive contributions in child health.

Criteria: 

  • Must be child health researchers of any specialty or advanced degree, including PhD researchers.
  • Must have displayed sustained record of excellence as a clinical investigator.
  • Does not have to be a member of Society for Pediatric Research.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for 2 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $500 at the PAS Meeting. Awardee will give lecture following presentation.
  • The Committee for the Douglas K. Richardson Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.

Nomination Requirements

  • Curriculum Vitae of Nominee
    • Include research activities.
  • Detailed Letter of Nomination
    • Provide evidence of substantive research contributions in the following.
  • Effective utilization of healthcare services.
  • Identification of risk factors for adverse outcomes.
  • General epidemiologic health services studies.
  • Patient-oriented clinical studies that lead of improved healthcare delivery to neonatal or broad pediatric population.
  • 3 Letters of Support (other than Nominator)
    • Should substantiate the nominee’s research career achievements and/or
    • Evidence of mentorship.

Physician Scientist Award: Bridging to Success

Deadline for Submission – Jan. 2, 2019

The mission of SPR is to create a network of multidisciplinary researchers to improve child health. Implicit in our mission is our foundational commitment to supporting the success of young investigators in child health research through activities that include facilitation of connection with peers, potential collaborators and national mentors. This year we are continuing this program, which was initiated in 2017, to achieve this goal.

The SPR Pediatric Research Physician Scientist Award supports transitioning pediatric physician scientists who have submitted a K08 or K23 award, which although not funded, may be potentially competitive on resubmission to the NIH.

The support mechanism consists of $40,000 awarded to the sponsoring institution with no indirect costs.  The sponsoring institution and Department must match the $40,000, thereby constituting $80,000 of the awardee support for one year. Salary support is the preferred mechanism of support though alternative uses of awarded funds may be considered on a case-by-case basis if justification for the use of funds for non-salary-related costs (which must be provided by the awardee) is approved by the SPR Awards committee.  In all cases, at least 75% protected research effort must be assured. The award does not allow for fringe or indirect costs and these costs should be covered by the institution from separate sources.  The $40,000 will be dispersed in two 6-month installments.  If the awardee receives a K-grant during the first 6-months, the awardees become ineligible for the final 6-month installment and the remaining funds will be offered to the runner-up.

Eligibility Criteria.  

1) MD and/or MD/PhD applicant who is an SPR member or SPR junior section member (rolling admission for SPR junior section applicants is available).

2) K08 or K23 application summary statement dated within the 2 calendar years of this RFA.

Application Requirements. A Letter of Intent signed by the applicant and sponsoring department chair should be submitted by January 2, 2019.   The Letter of Intent should include the following:

1) Agreement by the sponsoring department/institution to match the SPR award and to contribute the total amount to salary and/or research program of the awardee.

2) A statement assuring that the awardee will have 75% effort protected for research during the award year.

3) Specific Aims page of the supporting K08 or K23 application.

4) Summary Statement from the review of the supporting K08 or K23 dated January 1, 2017 or later.

5) Commitment from the applicant to provide SPR with requested updates on the outcome of the revised the K08 or K23 application submitted by the applicant after receipt of this award.

Based on review of the letters of intent, finalists will be chosen to submit a full package which will include the previously submitted K-award application, cover letter on how the support will be used for 12 months, and specific plans on how the applicant plans to revise the K-award application.  An awardee will also be invited to present his/her research as part of the SPR Presidential Scientific Plenary.  Finalists and awardees will be recognized at the SPR Awards luncheon of the PAS meeting.   There will also be opportunity for finalists to be matched to national SPR mentors within the Young Investigator Coaching program of the SPR, if desired.

Outstanding New Member Award

The Society for Pediatric Research recognizes new members who have contributed to high quality scientific research and who continue to demonstrate meaningful contributions in the pediatric academic field.  As an honor for new members conducting exceptional research, the SPR Council selects two individuals to present their research during the SPR Presidential Plenary of the PAS Meeting.

Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce

Deadline for Submission – March 15, 2019

SPR aims to create a network of multidisciplinary researchers to improve child health. Ensuring a diversified research workforce is essential to this goal.

This award was established by the SPR Council in 2017 and provides up to $1,000 travel expenses to the annual PAS Meeting for talented child health researchers who comes from an underrepresented background (as defined by NIH https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-053.html). The awardees are acknowledged for their promising science at the SPR Awards Luncheon at the annual PAS Meeting.

National SPR is able to support one PAS travel award per regional society. SPR Regional Society Leadership may nominate eligible candidates from their regional society by sending a brief description of the awardee and her/his associated science. Required information:

  • Awardee’s Name.
  • Awardee’s Email.
  • Name of the award the awardee was chosen for in your society.
  • Brief description of the awardee and his/her associated science.
  • Photo of the awardee.
  • Under-represented designation (refer to NIH description for categories).

Young Investigator Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

The prestigious Young Investigator Award was established by SPR in 1983. The award recognizes a rising star with outstanding scientific research accomplishments that help to unravel the mysteries of childhood development or disease.

Criteria:

  • Must have completed no more than 7 years post-training at the time of PAS 2018 Meeting (residency, post-doctoral or research fellowship).
  • Nominators of candidates who have completed more than 7 years of post-training due to interruption in research careers may request that committee waive stipulation.
  • Must not hold rank higher than Assistant Professor or equivalent.
  • Individuals with M.D. and/or Ph.D. are encouraged to apply.
  • Research work must have been conducted after graduation from medical school or completion of Ph.D.
  • Nominations must be made by a member of at least one of the Societies or Alliances comprise the Pediatric Academic Societies.
  • The Committee for the Young Investigator Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Member of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nomination.

Procedures:

  • The award will be presented to one individual annually.
  • Economy-level travel expenses, hotel accommodations for up to 4 nights and meeting registration will be provided.
  • The award will be presented with a commemorative plaque and an honorarium of $2,000 at the PAS 2018 Meeting. Awardee will give lecture following presentation.
  • The Committee for the Young Investigator Award will be solely responsible for recipient selection.
  • Members of the selection committee cannot nominate or support any nominations.
  • Awards will only be chosen when there are eligible candidates.

Nomination Requirements

  • Curriculum Vitae of Nominee
  • Manuscript of Research Work
    • Description of research work, the basis for the nomination.
    • Present in form of preprint or reprint of manuscripts representing fundamental research.
    • Maximum of 3 key papers reflecting research accomplished during post-training period.
  • Nominator’s Letter of Support
    • Must include detailed explanation of applicant’s role in research submitted.
    • Succinct and limited to 2 pages.
  • Senior Investigator Letter of Support (if other than Nominator)
    • Should be from an investigator from the laboratory where nominee carried out research submitted.
    • Include dates, department and location of research conducted there.
  • 3-5 additional Letters of Support
    • Letters should be from established investigators in the nominee’s field.
    • Provide critical evaluation of research work submitted for award.
    • Nominator should screen letters.
    • Limit to 2 pages for each letter.

Young Investigator Coaching Program

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

The SPR Young Investigator Coaching Program offers promising new pediatric researchers with mentoring opportunities from established national leaders in related research fields. Through this highly selective program, SPR strategically fosters development of successful early-career physician scientists and advances SPR’s mission to build a network of multi-disciplinary researchers to improve child health.

Eligibility for Mentees: 

  • Actively conducting child or adolescent health research.
  • Must have advanced doctoral degree in any child health related field (medicine, psychology, nursing, social work, nutrition).
  • Must be in the first 3 years of faculty appointment (Instructor, Assistant Professor or equivalent).
  • Intends to pursue an academic pediatric career with major focus on investigator-initiated research.
  • Must attend upcoming PAS Meeting .
  • All applicants are invited to apply. Individuals from groups identified by NIH as underrepresented in biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences such as Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander and Women as well as individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.
  • Applicants are encouraged to apply for membership in the SPR Junior Section if eligible.

Criteria for Selection

  • Potential for candidate to succeed as an academic investigator.
  • Commitment of candidate to pediatric research-oriented career.
  • Benefit provided to candidate by mentoring and support by YICP.
  • Availability of adequate mentoring at candidate’s institution.

Application Requirements

  • Descriptions of
    • Area of Expertise – 2-3 sentences.
    • Research Accomplishments – 150 words max.
    • Career Goals and Objectives – 150 words max.
    • Specific Aim of Current Research – 450 words max.
    • Why is external mentoring important and in what areas? – 150 words max.
  • List of Past and Current Mentors
    • Include name and title.
    • Include institution and project title/description.
  • List of Mentors at My Institution Available to Me
    • Include name and title.
    • Include institution and project title/description.
  • List of Mentors Elsewhere Who I Think Would Appropriate Coaches for Me
    • Include name and title.
    • Include institution and project title/description.
  • Letter of Support from Division Head or Department Chair addressing:
    • What the applicant is lacking in their environment in regards to mentoring.
    • How external mentoring provided by this program would be beneficial.
  • Applicant’s NIH Biosketch

European Young Investigator Exchange

This exchange program is an opportunity for the SPR to enhance its relationship with the European Society for Pediatric Research (ESPR) by fostering collaboration and providing educational exchange between the organizations. This program offers the opportunity for one ESPR young investigator to present his/her research at the annual Pediatric Academic (PAS) Meeting.  The candidate is selected by the ESPR to attend the PAS Meeting where he/she will be acknowledged for his/her accomplishment which includes receiving an award and presenting research to leaders within pediatric academics. In exchange, SPR will select one of its Fellow Research Awardees to attend the annual ESPR Meeting.

Japan Fellow Exchange

This exchange program is an opportunity for the SPR to enhance its relationship with the Japan Pediatric Society (JPS) by fostering collaboration and providing educational exchange between the organizations. This program offers opportunities for JPS young investigators to present their research at the annual Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting.  Each year, three young investigators are selected by the JPS to attend the PAS Meeting where they will be acknowledged for their accomplishments which includes receiving an award and presenting research to leaders within pediatric academics.

SPR Abstract Related Awards and Funding

House Officer Research Award

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors house officers engaged in pediatric research. These awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work presented in the abstract. Each awardee will receive a $1,000 award. One to three awards will be given.

Eligibility Criteria: House Officer must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of residency.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • Applicant must be a House Officer or Resident.
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract at the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of residency.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Meeting to be considered.
  • Letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of the abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

Student Research Award

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors students engaged in pediatric research. These awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work presented in the abstract. Each awardee will receive a $1,000 award. Three to six awards will be given; one to two in each of the categories below:

  • D./Ph.D. and Ph.D. Students:
    Eligibility Criteria: Student must submit and present abstract prior to the student receiving his/her M.D./Ph.D. or Ph.D. degree
  • Medical Students
    Eligibility Criteria: Student must submit and present abstract prior to the student receiving his/her M.D. degree.
  • High School and College Students
    Eligibility Criteria: Student must submit and present abstract prior to the student receiving his/her B.S./B.A degree.
  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Meeting to be considered.
  • Letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of the abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

PAS Meeting Travel Grant Program

Grants must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The Pediatric Academic Societies will award travel grants in the amount of $500 plus complimentary meeting registration to attend the PAS Annual Meeting. Travel grants are possible to runner-ups among the Fellow’s Basic & Clinical Research Award categories only. Indicate your interest by checking the PAS Travel Grant box in the online abstract submission program.

SPR and APS Joint Award

Mary Ellen Avery Award

Deadline for Submission – Nov. 7, 2018

In 2013, the APS and SPR established and endowed the Mary Ellen Avery Award.  This award honors Dr. Avery’s outstanding lifetime achievements and seminal contributions to neonatal health through her discovery of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), her research and academic leadership, and her outstanding service to pediatrics and neonatology.

With this award the APS and SPR seek to recognize a pediatric investigator who has made important contributions to neonatal health through basic or translational research.

Eligibility:

  • Pediatric investigator with a sustained record of excellence as a neonatal health investigator.
  • Record of substantive:
    • Neonatal health research contributions.
    • Impact on the field.
    • National and international recognition.

Nomination:

  • Detailed Letter of Nomination*.
  • Three Letters of Support*.
  • Letters should provide ample evidence of a Nominee’s substantive:
    • Neonatal health research contributions.
    • Impact on the field.
    • National and international recognition.
  • Nominee curriculum vitae with bibliography of published works.
    • An asterisk (*) should identify the five papers that the Nominee’s regards as his/her most significant contributions.
    • Research productivity by the Nominee’s mentees should be indicated by highlighting the names of these individuals in each publication.

* Note:  The Nominator may not also author a Letter of Support.  Members of the Selection Committee may not nominate or support nominations.

Selection:

  • The Committee for the Mary Ellen Avery Award is solely responsible for selection.
  • Selection is made February 2019.

Award: 

  • Scientific presentation (15-minutes) at PAS Meeting session.
  • $1,000 honorarium and plaque presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting.
  • Complimentary PAS Meeting registration.
  • Economy airfare to PAS Meeting, if booked 30 days in advance.
  • Two-nights at PAS hotel, if booked 30 days in advance.
  • Awardee will be invited to serve on the Selection Committee

FOPO Award

Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award

The Federation of Pediatric Organizations (FOPO) is composed of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Academic Pediatric Association, American Pediatric Society, American Board of Pediatrics, Association of Medical School Pediatric Department Chairs, Association of Pediatric Program Directors, and Society for Pediatric Research. The purpose of FOPO is to promote optimal health for children by building on the efforts and expertise of the member organizations, and on the relationships between the member organizations to accomplish shared goals.

The Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award was created in honor of Dr. St. Geme to recognize a pediatrician who is a role model for others to emulate as a clinician, an educator, and/or an investigator. Recipients of this award have had a record of broad and sustained contributions to pediatrics that have had or will have a major impact on child health. Most importantly, the award recognizes those individuals who have “created a future” within the field.

The criteria for the selection of the Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr., MD Leadership Award recipient are as follows:

The individual must be a pediatrician who is perceived as a role model for others to emulate, as a clinician, an educator, and/or an investigator.

  • The individual must be a leader who has “created a future” for pediatrics and for children and has played an active role in one or more organizations sponsoring this award.
  • The individual should preferably have a record of broad sustained contributions to pediatrics that have had or will have a major impact on child health.
  • The individual must be currently active in pediatrics.

The individual can be a retired member of any of the pediatric organizations sponsoring this award.

Additional Information

Fellows’ Basic Research Awards

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors fellows engaged in pediatric basic research. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work (basic research) presented in the abstract.  Each of these awards carries a monetary prize of $1,000.  All awardees are chosen from the general category of SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Awards.

The SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. There is a maximum of 6 awards given from this category:

  • 3 Basic Research Awards
  • 1 David G. Nathan Award
  • 2 additional Basic Research Awards, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section

Fellows’ Basic Research Award (3 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

Eligibility Criteria for Awards: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

David G. Nathan Award in Basic Research (1 award given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR David G. Nathan Award in Basic Research by a Fellow was established in 2000 by the colleagues, trainees, and friends of Dr. Nathan to honor his achievements in every aspect of academic pediatrics. The winning candidate is chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Award applicants whose abstract has been accepted for a platform session.

Eligibility Criteria: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

SPR Basic Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section (2 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR Basic Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section was established in 2013.  The winning candidates are chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Basic Research Award Applicants, in addition, must be a member of the SPR Junior Section membership.

Eligibility Criteria: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

Fellows’ Clinical Research Awards

The Society for Pediatric Research annually honors fellows engaged in pediatric clinical research. Winning candidates are selected based on the quality of the work (clinical or translational research) presented in the abstract.  Each of these awards carries a monetary prize of $1,000.  All awardees are chosen from the general category of SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Awards applications.

The SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Awards are designed to encourage pediatricians in training to pursue careers in academic pediatrics. There is a maximum of 6 awards given from this category:

  • 3 Clinical Research Awards
  • 1 Richard D. Rowe Award
  • 2 additional Clinical Research Awards, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section

Fellows’ Clinical Research Award (3 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

Eligibility Criteria for Awards: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • Applicant must be a Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify).
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be clinical or translational research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the Pediatric Academic Societies’ (PAS) Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Annual Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

Richard D. Rowe Award in Clinical Research (1 award given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR Richard D. Rowe Award for Clinical Research by a Fellow was established in 1988 by the colleagues, trainees, and friends of Dr. Rowe to honor his many personal achievements, commitment to academic excellence, integrity and humility.  The winning candidate is chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Award applicants whose abstract has been accepted for a platform session.

Eligibility Criteria: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • The applicant must be Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify.)
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be basic research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the PAS Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS 2017 Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

SPR Clinical Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section (2 awards given annually)

This award must be applied for at the time of PAS abstract submission.

The SPR Clinical Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior SPR Members’ Section was established in 2013.  The winning candidate is chosen from the SPR Fellow’s Clinical Research Award Applicants, in addition, must be a member of the SPR Junior Section membership.

Eligibility Criteria for Awards: Fellow must submit and present the abstract prior to the completion of the fellowship.

Candidates must fulfill the following conditions:

  • Complete the online application form and submit their abstract and supplemental materials by the abstract submission deadline.
  • The applicants need to describe their contribution to the project when asked to provide “brief description of the work performed”.
  • Applicant must be a Fellow in Training (Ph.D. post-doctoral fellows do not qualify).
  • Applicant must submit and be able to present the abstract during the PAS Meeting prior to the completion of fellowship.
  • The abstract must be clinical or translational research.
  • First authorship on an abstract submitted to the Pediatric Academic Societies’ (PAS) Meeting. The abstract must be accepted for presentation at the PAS Annual Meeting to be considered.
  • A letter from the senior investigator or sponsor that includes a statement that the work was performed by the nominee and fully addresses the role the candidate had in the work and why the caliber of this study is worthy of a national award.
  • The recipient must present the study at the PAS Meeting.

Applications that do not meet the conditions stated above will not be considered for the awards. The accuracy of your abstract and application is the applicants’ responsibility. Please proofread carefully before submitting. After submission, no corrections will be permitted. By submitting, you are approving the accuracy of your abstract and application.

SPR Awards Recipients

Maureen Andrew Mentor Award

Andrew Fineman, MD

Dr. Fineman received his medical degree from the New York University School of Medicine. He completed pediatric residency and Chief Residency at NYU/Bellevue Medical Center, followed by a critical care fellowship at UCSF. Dr. Fineman is a Professor and Vice Chair of Pediatrics, Director of Critical Care Medicine, Director of the Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Service, and Investigator of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of California, San Francisco, Benioff Children’s Hospital, where he is the Director of the Pediatric Translational Research Core Facility. Dr. Fineman leads an NIH funded research program studying the regulation of pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance in the normal and abnormal fetal, transitional, and postnatal circulations, utilizing clinically relevant large animal models of disease. In particular, his focus has been on the role of endothelial function in these systems. In addition, Dr. Fineman directs clinical-translational projects investigating molecules with potential as biomarkers to predict outcome after cardiothoracic surgery for congenital heart disease and is involved in clinical projects investigating agents for therapy and prevention of pulmonary hypertension. His laboratory has been funded by the American Heart Association, the March of Dimes, the Leducq Foundation, and the NIH. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards including the John J. Sampson Award in Research, an Established Investigator Award, and a Mentoring Award from the American Heart Association. In addition, he is an Associate Editor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the NIH K12 in Pediatric Critical Care, Program Director of the UCSF Department of Pediatrics NIH K12 CHRC, and PI of a Pediatric Critical Care Medicine NIH T32 program.

Thomas A. Hazinski Distinguished Service Award

Kate Ackerman

Dr. Ackerman is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Biomedical Genetics and the Senior Vice Chair of Innovation & Integration in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester.  As a physician scientist, she works at the nexus of genetics and developmental biology focusing on poorly understood diseases and bridging the basic sciences with clinical medicine. She is best known for her work in congential diaphragmatic hernia, and more recently she completed a sabbatical at the Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM) in Vienna, Austria where she worked with leaders in genomics and epigenetics.  She remains an adjunct faculty member at CeMM where she is able to collaborate and interact with an international and creative team of scientists focused on innovative therapeutics and diagnostics.

Dr. Ackerman has been an SPR member since 2006 and has participated in SPR leadership since 2014.  From 2014-2018, she served as the Secretary/Treasurer, more aptly renamed as the SPR Strategy & Operations Officer.  Her numerous SPR leadership roles include work on multiple work groups and committees including finance, meeting content, communications, and others.  She has served as the SPR representative to the Federation of Pediatric Organizations (FOPO) as well as to the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Program, Operating, and Executive Committees.   She currently serves as Chair of the PAS Operating Committee.

Dr. Ackerman has been instrumental in helping to lead the SPR and the PAS meeting through a period of unexpected change after the untimely passing of Debbie Anagnostelis.  During this period, it was necessary to review, document, and update many aspects of our complex collaborative central office structure, and it was necessary to identify, hire, and train a new Executive Director (Eileen Fenton).

We have seen growth in the breadth and number of SPR initiatives as well as changes in the PAS Meeting as attendance has swelled.  This has also been a time of technological change, requiring functional integration.  Dr. Ackerman participated in PAS Strategic Planning and has worked tirelessly to identify and implement new improvements in the PAS Meeting, especially as a representative to the needs of the SPR membership.  For her remarkable leadership and indefatigable service to the SPR, Dr. Ackerman is the 2018 Thomas A. Hazinski Distinguished Service Award winner.

Society for Pediatric Research Award in Honor of E. Mead Johnson

Helen Su, M.D., Ph.D.

Helen Su, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Investigator and Chief of the Human Immunological Diseases Section, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health
My laboratory carries out research to elucidate novel molecular mechanisms that regulate the human immune system, and how their derangements cause susceptibility to virus and other infections. We do this by using state-of-the-art genomic approaches to study patients who have rare and poorly characterized inherited immunodeficiencies. By carefully investigating these “experiments of nature” we can draw inferences about molecular functions based on patient phenotype. Through a broad program that integrates the patients’ clinical evaluations, assessments of their immune function, genetic and biochemical analyses, especially using new technologies such as high throughput gene sequencing, we gain profound insights into the molecular and cellular basis of immunity against microbes. Although our past work has centered mainly on combined immunodeficiencies, about three years ago we also started studying patients with defects in innate immunity.

My approach as both a clinical and basic science researcher is to combine the powerful clinical investigatory resources of the NIH Clinical Center with the extensive basic science capability within the Division of Intramural Research to define new clinical entities and their molecular pathogenesis. By utilizing the latest molecular, genomic, and cellular technologies to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms that normally regulate host defense, we also aim to improve diagnosis and treatment for these and related immunological conditions. This is exactly the same approach we will undertake with Dr. Randolph’s cohort of patients.

The ongoing success of my program attests to my expertise and training as a physician-scientist, which I have drawn upon in leading my own research group as well as in collaborating with other groups. I am board certified in General Pediatrics and Allergy & Immunology and have admitting privileges at the NIH Clinical Center, where I evaluate patients with unknown or new types of primary immunodeficiency. Additionally, I have expertise in molecular and cellular immunology, virology, biochemistry, and mouse models of viral disease. My laboratory’s publications attest to my ability to lead and collaborate with other teams of physicians and scientists to identify rare or novel genetic variants and establish causality for inherited susceptibility to infection.

Douglas K. Richardson Award

Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD

Bonnie W. Ramsey, MD is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. She is Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Pediatrics and holds the Endowed Chair in Cystic Fibrosis at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She is also the Director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research (CCTR) at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and is the co-PI of the University of Washington Institute of Translational Health Sciences (ITHS) supported by the NCATS Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA).

Dr. Ramsey received her BA from Stanford University in 1972 and her MD from Harvard Medical School in 1976. After pediatric residency training at Boston Children’s Hospital, she came to Seattle Children’s in 1978 first as a resident and fellow and then became an attending physician in 1980. Her career has focused on clinical care and research in the field of Cystic Fibrosis (CF). She is internationally recognized for her work in developing new therapies for patients with CF. She is also interested in the ethics of pediatric clinical research and has served on two Institute of Medicine committees focused on this topic.

For nearly the past two decades, Bonnie directed the Coordinating Center for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics (CFFT) Development Network (TDN), a national clinical trials network that has successfully conducted therapeutic trials assisting in the development of novel treatments for patients with this disorder. Several of the drugs have reached FDA approval, significantly impacting the lives of patients with CF. She now serves as a Senior Consultant to the TDN.

Outstanding New Member Science Award

Katherine Y. King, MD, PhD

Katherine Y. King MD PhD is an Assistant Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine, where she is also part of the faculty for the Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Center, the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, and the graduate program in Immunology. A native Houstonian, Dr. King received her BA in Biochemical Sciences from Harvard University and her MD and PhD degrees from Washington University in St. Louis. She completed her residency, chief residency, and fellowship training in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine. During her fellowship, she pursued postdoctoral research in the lab of Dr. Margaret Goodell to establish a new avenue of investigation regarding the effects of infection and inflammation on hematopoietic stem cells. With the long-term goal of alleviating deaths from infectious diseases, her current research focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which inflammation affects blood and immune cell production by hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. Dr. King has been the recipient of a NIH K08 mentored physician scientist training award, the March of Dimes Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Award, the Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation Liviya Anderson Award, and the Caroline Wiess Law Foundation in Molecular Medicine Award. Her research is currently supported by NIH R01 grants aimed at delineating the role of inflammation in clonal hematopoiesis and studying the role of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in innate immunity. When she is not seeing patients at Texas Children’s Hospital or conducting research in the lab, Dr. King enjoys running, Iyengar yoga, and volunteering her time for health care advocacy through the group Doctors for Change.

Indi Trehan, MD

Indi is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine and Infectious Diseases) at Washington University in St. Louis and the Medical Director of Lao Friends Hospital for Children. His clinical, research, advocacy, and educational interests span the full spectrum of tropical pediatric diseases. The majority of his research has been in childhood malnutrition and has involved the conduct of large randomized clinical trials and longitudinal observational studies in rural Malawi. He feels extremely fortunate to have been part of several major studies that have demonstrated that:

  • the inclusion of animal-source proteins in therapeutic foods for severe and moderate acute malnutrition improves recovery rates and decreases relapse (J Nutr 2010, Am J Clin Nutr 2012, Am J Clin Nutr 2016);
  • children with severe acute malnutrition who are treated with an empiric course of antibiotics have a mortality rate 40% lower than those who are treated with only nutritional therapy (N Engl J Med 2013, BMJ 2014);
  • more stringent anthropometric recovery criteria decrease the rate of relapse of moderately malnourished children without a vast increase in expense (J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2015, Br J Nutr 2018, J Nutr 2018);
  • there is a predictable pattern of maturation of the enteric microbiome in children as they age (Nature 2012), that a delay in this microbial maturation is strongly associated with the development of severe acute malnutrition (Science 2013, Sci Trans Med 2015, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015), and that a consortium of 11 bacterial species can reverse  malnutrition-associated enteropathy in a mouse model (Science 2016);
  • children with stunting (EBioMedicine 2016, Am J Clin Nutr 2016, Am J Clin Nutr 2017), environmental enteric dysfunction (Sci Rep 2016, EBioMedicine 2017, J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2017), and severe acute malnutrition (J Nutr 2016)

At the same time, he appreciates that for every groundbreaking study, there are always several attempts that have failed. He thus reports equal gratitude for how much he has learned from a number of negative studies that have shown little to no benefit in combating relapse from acute malnutrition (Am J Clin Nutr 2017), in treating acute malnutrition in pregnant women (Am J Clin Nutr 2017), and from a several attempts at decreasing the burden of environmental enteric dysfunction in an effort to decrease stunting and growth faltering in children (Am J Gastroenterol 2009, Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2014, J Nutr 2014, J Nutr 2017, Trials 2017, Am J Clin Nutr 2017, J Nutr 2018).

Physician Scientist Award: Bridging to Success

Elizabeth Bhoj, MD

Dr. Bhoj is currently an instructor in Human Genetics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where she works in translational genomics. She focuses on the discovery and functional characterization of novel neurogenetic syndromes, and the development of novel therapeutics based on these discoveries. She earned an MD and a PhD in Human Genetics from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, then completed residencies in pediatrics and medical genetics, and a fellowship in clinical molecular genetics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She also earned a Masters of Translational Research from the University of Pennsylvania. Since she finished fellowship in 2016, she have been a post-doctoral researcher in the laboratory of Hakon Hakonarson, MD PhD at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She has unique training across both clinical and basic science, and is board-certified in three clinical specialties. Dr. Bhoj’s research combines her “bedside” work in diagnostic clinical genetics and molecular genetics with her “bench” work in elucidating the mechanisms of the genes she discovers. Currently she focuses on the study of patients who have undiagnosed combined neurologic and craniofacial syndromes, as this population is highly enriched for single-gene disorders. She is especially interested in novel gene discoveries that can be translated into targeted therapeutics. Dr. Bhoj has been instrumental in the discovery of several new syndromes, including one that was partially named in recognition of her work.

Physician Scientist Runner-Up Award

Matthew Kelly, MD

Dr. Kelly graduated from Harvard Medical School and obtained a Master’s degree in Quantitative Methods from the Harvard School of Public Health. He completed his residency training in the Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics, lived and worked in Botswana for two years through the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia David N. Pincus Global Health Fellowship Program, and subsequently completed subspecialty training in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Duke University. Dr. Kelly is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Duke University and a faculty member in the Duke Microbiome Center. His long-term career goal is to develop strategies that use targeted manipulation of the microbiome for the prevention and treatment of infections in children.

The proposed research aims to define the complex relationships that exist between sociodemographic factors, the upper respiratory microbiome, and potential pneumonia pathogens. Dr. Kelly hypothesizes that commensal bacteria in the nasopharyngeal microbiome resist colonization and invasion by bacterial respiratory pathogens and are thus an important component of host resistance to pneumonia. Dr. Kelly will evaluate associations between sociodemographic and clinical factors and the nasopharyngeal microbiome among infants in Botswana. In completing this Aim, he will further knowledge of external factors that influence nasopharyngeal microbiome composition. Dr. Kelly will next determine if the composition of the nasopharyngeal microbiome predicts the risks of Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization and clinical pneumonia during infancy. This research could ultimately lead to the development of the first rationally-designed probiotics for the prevention of pneumonia and other respiratory infections.

Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce

Eastern Society for Pediatric Research (ESPR)

Suhasini Kaushal

Midwest Society for Pediatric Research (MWSPR)

Courtney Rowan

   

Southern Society for Pediatric Research (SSPR)

Rolando Macias

Western Society for Pediatric Research (WSPR)

Viviana Fajardo

   

Young Investigator Award

Alex Kentsis, MD, PhD

Alex Kentsis is a pediatric oncologist and cancer biologist. His research takes advantage of modern technologies to improve our understanding of the biologic causes of blood and solid tumors. Together with colleagues, he has made discoveries about new therapeutic targets in cancer cells, mechanisms by which cancer cells can evade new treatments, and improved strategies to overcome treatment resistance. Recently, his lab has identified new mechanisms of aberrant gene control and resistance to apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemias, and mechanisms of site-specific oncogenic mutations and DNA repair dependencies in solid tumors. This work is now poised to define precise molecular mechanisms that would lead to rational therapeutic strategies for patients.

SPR and APS Joint Award Recipient

Mary Ellen Avery Neonatal Research Award

Richard J. Martin, MBBS, FRACP

Dr. Richard J. Martin is Professor of Pediatrics, Reproductive Biology, and Physiology & Biophysics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and Director of Research for the Division of Neonatology at Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio. He was raised and educated in Australia, and received his medical degree from the University of Sydney School of Medicine. He is the inaugural holder of the Drusinsky/Fanaroff Chair in Neonatology, Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital, where he has spent his entire academic career.

Dr. Martin is a most sought after national and international expert in the field of Developmental Respiratory Neurobiology. His research is focused primarily on apnea of prematurity, intermittent hypoxia, and lung and airway injury. This encompasses the use of neonatal animal models to elicit maturation of respiratory control mechanisms
and the precursors of airway injury. His research has been highly translational, and he has served on the steering committees of several multicenter clinical trials which have impacted neonatal care. He has been funded by the NIH for over 35 years, and has trained many of the leaders in Academic Neonatology in the United States and abroad.

Dr. Martin is senior editor of the major neonatal text, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, along with Drs. Avroy A. Fanaroff and Michele C. Walsh. Also to his credit are approximately 200 first- and/or co-authored articles in peer-reviewed journals, and over 100 chapters and reviews published in well-known books in the medical field. He
serves on numerous editorial boards, is past Chair of the Sub-Board of Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine of the American Board of Pediatrics. He is the 2017 recipient of the Virginia Apgar Award of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Perinatal Section.

On a personal note, Dr. Martin has been married to Dr. Patricia Martin 47 years. They have two children, both practicing psychiatrists, and four grandchildren.

FOPO Award Recipient

Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award

Mark Schuster, MD, PHD, FAAP

Mark Schuster, MD, PhD, became the founding dean and CEO of the Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine in October 2017.  Prior to his appointment, he had served as the William Berenberg Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and chief of general pediatrics and vice chair for health policy in the Department of Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital since 2007.

Dr. Schuster is recognized as an international leader in research on child, adolescent, and family health, having received funding from NIH, CDC, and AHRQ on topics such as quality of care, health disparities, family leave, HIV prevention, obesity prevention, and adolescent sexual health.  He has also studied bullying and sexual and gender minority health.

He previously served as professor of pediatrics and health services at UCLA Schools of Medicine and Public Health and director of health promotion and disease prevention at RAND, the Santa Monica think tank.

Dr. Schuster has co-authored over 200 journal articles and 2 books.  He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and has served as president of the Academic Pediatric Association.  He is a recipient of the Richardson Award for lifetime achievement from the Society for Pediatric Research, the Research Award from the Academic Pediatric Association, and the Barger Excellence in Mentoring Award from Harvard Medical School.

He received his BA summa cum laude from Yale, his MD from Harvard Medical School, his MPP from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and his PhD from the Pardee RAND Graduate School.  He completed his pediatric residency at Boston Children’s Hospital and his fellowship at the UCLA Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program.

SPR Abstract Related Awards and Funding Recipients

House Officer Research Award

Joseph Alge

 Stephanie Davis-Rodriguez

 Colm Travers

Student Research Award

Sietski Annette Berghius

Hannah Itell

Sydney Rooney

Rachel Shenoi

Jessica Thomson

Jennifer Varner

Japan Pediatric Society Fellow Exchange Award

Kimino Fujimura

Toshihiko Suzuki

Hironori Shibata

European Society for Pediatric Research Young Investigator Award

Nathalie Claesens

Fellows’ Basic Research Award (3 awards given annually)

Abbie Bauer

Steven J. Jonas

Kathleen Schwabenbauer

David G. Nathan in Basic Research Award (1 award given annually)

Julie Nogee

Basic Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior Section (2 awards given annually)

Andrew Franklin

Frederick Dapaah-Siakwan

Fellow’s Clinical Research Award (3 awards given annually)

Anne Fuller

Megan Griffiths

Richard D. Rowe Award in Clinical Research (1 award given annually)

Catherine Buck

Fellows’ Clinical Research Awards for Fellows, sponsored by the Junior Section ( 2 awards given annually)

Jennifer Davidson

David Neil Matlock, Jr.

Past Award Recipients

Maureen Andrew Mentor Award

  • 2017 | Michael R. DeBaun, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2016 | Diana W. Bianchi, Floating Hospital for Children, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • 2015 | Steven H. Abman, Children’s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, Aurora CO
  • 2014 | Kathryn M. Edwards, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2013 | Roberta and Philip Ballard, UCSF, CA
  • 2012 | William Oh, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI
  • 2011 | David K. Stevenson, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA
  • 2010 | Norman David Rosenblum, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
  • 2009 | Jon E. Tyson, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX
  • 2008 | Sherin U. Devaskar, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
  • 2007 | Ron G. Rosenfeld, Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, Palo Alto, CA
  • 2006 | Donna M. Ferriero, University of California, San Francisco, CA
  • 2005 | Edward R. B. McCabe, University of California, Los Angeles, CA
  • 2004 | George Lister, Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX
  • 2003 | Arnold L. Smith, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, Seattle, WA

Mary Ellen Avery Award (SPR and APS Joint Award)

  • 2017 | Alan H. Jobe, MD, PhD
  • 2016 | Steven H. Abman, MD
  • 2015 | Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD
  • 2014 | John A. Clements, MD

Thomas A. Hazinski Distinguished Service Award

  • 2017 | Vivek Balasubramanian, University of Wisconsin/American Family Children’s Hospital, Madison, WI
  • 2016 | Kate Culliton, APS/SPR Central Office, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2015 | Catherine Gordon, Hasbro Children’s Hospital and Brown University, Providence, RI
    and Barbara Anagnostelis, APS/SPR Central Office, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2014 | Thomas P. Shanley, MICHR, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 2013 | Elena Fuentes-Afflick, University of California, San Francisco, CA
  • 2012 | Jana M. Wells, SPR Central Office, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2011 | Charles V. (Skip) Smith, Seattle Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Seattle, WA
  • 2010 | Alan H. Jobe, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • 2009 | Gail Demmler-Harrison, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
  • 2008 | Karen Hendricks, Washington, DC
  • 2007 | Kathy A. Cannon, The Woodlands, TX
  • 2006 | Thomas Hazinski, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • 2005 | Samuel Hawgood, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco, CA
  • 2004 | Thomas N. Hansen, Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
  • 2003 | Myron Genel, Yale University, New Haven, CT
  • 2002 | Debbie Anagnostelis, The Woodlands, TX

Society for Pediatric Research Award in honor of E. Mead Johnson

2017

  • Jordan S. Orange, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX

2016

  • Kimberly Stegmaier, Boston Children’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Sing Sing Way, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH

2015

  • Ophir David Klein, University of California, San Francisco, CA
  • Loren D. Walensky, Children’s Hospital – Boston / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

2014

  • Atul Butte, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • John Vance Williams, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN

2013

  • William T. Pu, Children’s Hospital Boston, MA
  • Bradley L. Schlaggar, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

2012

  • Scott Armstrong, Harvard Medical School, Children’s Hospital Boston, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • Nicholas Katsanis, Duke University, Durham, NC

2011

  • Joel Hirschhorn, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA
  • Eric Vilain, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, CA

2010

  • Jean-Laurent Casanova, The Rockefeller University Hospital, New York, New York
  • Fernando Pedro Polack, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

2009

  • George Q. Daley, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • Brendan Lee, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

2008

  • Todd R. Golub, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • Victor Nizet, University of California, San Diego & Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA

2007

  • Marc E. Rothenberg, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA

2006

  • James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • David Pellman, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MD

2005

  • Elizabeth C. Engle, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA
  • Terence R. Flotte, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

2004

  • Bruce D. Gelb, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • Friedhelm Hildebrandt, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

2003

  • Gregory S. Barsh, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
  • Val C. Sheffield, University of Iowa, Iowa City

2002

  • Nancy C. Andrews, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • Markus Grompe, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland

2001

  • Alan D. D’Andrea, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • Steve A.N. Goldstein, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

2000

  • Mark A. Kay, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • Gregg L. Semenza, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

1999

  • Steven H. Abman, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
  • Chaim M. Roifman, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

1998

  • Jonathan D. Gitlin, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • James R. Lupski, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Jeffrey C. Murray, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City

1997

  • Donald Y.M. Leung, National Jewish Center for Immunology & Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO
  • Elaine Tuomanen, St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

1996

  • Perrin C. White, U.T. Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
  • Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

1995

  • Margaret K. Hostetter, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Alan M. Krensky, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

1994

  • David A. Williams, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis
  • David H. Perlmutter, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

1993

  • Edward R.B. McCabe, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Alan L. Schwartz, Washingt

1992

  • Ann Margaret Arvin, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA
  • Francis S. Collins, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor
  • Lap-Chee Tsui, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada on University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

1991

  • Louis M. Kunkel, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Ronald G. Worton, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

1990

  • Gregory A. Grabowski, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York
  • Arnold W. Strauss, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

1989

  • Steven M. Reppert, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Robert H. Yolken, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MA

1988

  • Jeffrey A. Whitsett, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Barry Wolf, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond

1987

  • Donald C. Anderson, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Stuart H. Orkin, The Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA

1986

  • Raif Salim Geha, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Alan H. Jobe, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance

1985

  • Russell W. Chesney, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison
  • Augustine Joseph D’Ercole, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1984

  • Jan L. Breslow, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • John A. Phillips, III, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

1983

  • Laurence A. Boxer, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor
  • Samuel E. Lux, IV, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

1982

  • Larry J. Shapiro, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Campus, Torrance
  • Jerry A. Winkelstein, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD

1981

  • Robert J. Desnick, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York
  • Erwin W. Gelfand, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

1980

  • R. Michael Blaese, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • S. Michael Mauer, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

1979

  • Philip L. Ballard, University of California, San Francisco
  • *Harvey R. Colten, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA

1978

  • *Samuel A. Latt, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Pearay L. Ogra, State University of New York at Buffalo

1977

  • Arthur J. Ammann, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco
  • *Michael E. Miller, UCLA School of Medicine, Torrance

1976

  • *Haig H. Kazazian, Jr., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • *David Lawrence Rimoin, UCLA School of Medicine, Torrance

1975

  • John B. Robbins, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • *David H. Smith, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • *Rawle M. McIntosh, University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver

1974

  • Andre J. Nahmias, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  • E. Richard Stiehm, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles

1973

  • Henry L. Nadler, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
  • James G. White, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis

1972

  • Chester M. Edelmann, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • *Frank A. Oski, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia

1971

  • Paul G. Quie, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • *Fred S. Rosen, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA

1970

  • Myron Winick, New York Hospital, Cornell Medical Center, New York
  • Joseph A. Bellanti, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC

1969

  • Frederick C. Battaglia, University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver
  • *Gerard B. Odell, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD

1968

  • *Mary Ellen Avery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
  • Charles R. Scriver, Montreal Children’s Hospital, Montreal, Canada

1967

  • Henry Neil Kirkman, Jr., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • *Henry M. Meyer, Jr., National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Paul D. Parkman, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

1966

  • *William H. Tooley, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco
  • Robert W. Winters, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York

1965

  • *David Y.-Y Hsia, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL
  • *L. Stanley James, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York

1964

  • *Robert M. Chanock, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Abraham M. Rudolph, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York

1963

  • *D. Carleton Gajdusek, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Richard T. Smith, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville

1962

  • *Park S. Gerald, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Robert L. Vernier, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis

1961

  • *Lytt Irvine Gardner, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, NY
  • *Donald E. Pickering, University of Oregon Medical School, Portland

1960

  • *Robert A. Aldrich, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
  • *Irving Schulman, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL

1959

  • *C. Henry Kempe, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver
  • *Barton Childs, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

1958

  • *William A. Silverman, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
  • *Norman Kretchmer, Cornell University Medical College, New York

1957

  • *Alfred M. Bongiovanni, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • Walter R. Eberlein, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • *Albert Dorfman, University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL

1956

  • David Gitlin, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Arnall Patz, District of Columbia General Hospital and Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD

1955

  • *Robert A. Good, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis

1954

  • *Robert E. Cooke, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • *Vincent C. Kelley, University of Utah College of Medicine, Salt Lake City

1953

  • *Frederick C. Robbins, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • *Thomas H. Weller, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • *Margaret H. Smith, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA

1952

  • Seymour S. Cohen, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • Orvar Swenson, Tufts College Medical School, Boston, MA
  • *Edward B.D. Neuhauser, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

1951

  • *William M. Wallace, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • *Victor A. Najjar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

1950

  • *Charles D. May, State University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • *Harry Shwachman, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MD
  • *Gertrude Henle, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • *Werner Henle, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia

1949

  • *Nathan B. Talbot, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • *Henry L. Barnett, Cornell University Medical College, New York

1948

  • *Wolf W. Zuelzer, Wayne University College of Medicine, Detroit, MI
  • *Benjamin M. Spock, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, NY

1947

  • Helen B. Taussig, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • *Louis K. Diamond, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

1946

  • *Horace L. Hodes, Sydenham Hospital, Baltimore, MD
  • *Paul A. Harper, Medical Corps, United States Army

1944

  • *Fuller Albright, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

1943

  • Hattie E. Alexander, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York
  • Philip Levine, Newark, NJ

1942

  • David Bodian, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Howard A. Howe, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Harold E. Harrison, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Helen C. Harrison, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

1941

  • René J. Dubos, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York
  • Albert S. Sabin, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH

1940

  • Robert E. Gross, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Lee E. Farr, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York

1939

  • Frederic A. Gibbs, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Dorothy H. Anderson, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York

Douglas K. Richardson Award

  • 2017 | Roger F. Soll, University of Vermont Burlington, VT
  • 2016 | Shoo K. Lee, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada
  • 2015 | Waldemar A. Carlo, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL
  • 2014 | Mark A. Schuster, Boston Children’s Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2013 | Betty R. Vohr, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, RI
  • 2012 | Sten H. Vermund, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Nashville, TN
  • 2011 | Saroj Saigal, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
  • 2010 | Jeffrey B. Gould, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA
  • 2009 | Gary L. Freed, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 2008 | Ruth E.K. Stein, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Boston, NY
  • 2007 | M. Jeffrey Maisels, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI
  • 2006 | Marie C. McCormick, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
  • 2005 | Maureen Hack, Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • 2004 | Jon E. Tyson, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, Houston, TX
  • 2003 | Murray M. Pollack, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC

Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award (FOPO Award)

2017 | Carol Carraccio
2016 | David Kendall Stevenson, MD
2015 | Barry Zuckerman, MD
2014 | Lewis First, MD
2013 | Renee Jenkin’s, MD
2012 | Gail McGuinness, MD
2011 | George Lister, MD
2010 | Stephen Ludwig, MD
2009 | Kenneth Roberts, MD
2008 | Douglas Jones, MD
2007 | Richard Behrman, MD
2006 | Carol Berkowitz, MD
2005 | Robert Kelch, MD
2004 | Myron Genel, MD
2003 | Thomas Boat, MD
2002 | Walter Tunnessen, MD
2001 | Russell Chesney, MD
2000 | Evan Charney, MD
1999 | James Stockman, MD
1998 | Catherine DeAngelis, MD
1997 | Errol Alden, MD
1996 | Jimmy Simon, MD
1995 | Ralph Feigin, MD
1994 | Vincent Fulginiti, MD
1993 | Abraham Rudolph, MD
1992 | Morris Green, MD
1991 | Lewis Barness, MD
1990 | Frank Oski, MD
1989 | Robert Haggerty, MD
1988 | Sam Katz, MD

Physician Scientist Award: Bridging to Success

  • 2017 | Sagori Mukhopadhyay, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce

2017

  • Christiana N. Oji-Mmuo, Penn State Children’s Hospital, Penn State College of Medicine. Hershey, PA
  • Rakhee M. Bowker, Rush University Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL
  • Ariel A. Salas, University of Alabama School of Medicine. Birmingham, AL
  • Tracylyn Yellowhair, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Young Investigator Award

  • 2017 | Daniel E. Bauer, Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • 2016 | Jeffrey D. Dvorin, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2015 | Vijay G, Sankaran, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2014 | Sallie R. Permar, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC
  • 2013 | Heather Mefford, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • 2012 | Kimberly Stegmaier, Children’s Hospital Boston, MA
  • 2011 | Juliane Bubeck Wardenburg, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • 2010 | Atul J. Butte, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
  • 2009 | Loren Walensky, Harvard Medical School / Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • 2008 | Brian Jay Feldman, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2007 | Michael J. Ackerman, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • 2006 | Fernando Pedro Polack, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • 2005 | Anne Marguerite Moon, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT
  • 2004 | Joel N. Hirschhorn, Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 2003 | Michael C.V. Jensen, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA
  • 2002 | Andrew Scharenberg, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
  • 2001 | James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • 2000 | Brendan Lee, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • 1999 | Louis J. Muglia, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • 1998 | Michael J. Bamshad, University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City
  • 1997 | Todd R. Golub, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1996 | Gary A. Herman, University of California, San Francisco
  • 1995 | Melissa Elder, University of California, San Francisco
  • 1994 | Nancy C. Andrews, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • 1993 | Harry C. Dietz, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1992 | Raymond G. Watts, University of Alabama, Birmingham
  • 1991 | Sally Radovick, Case Western Reserve, University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • 1990 | Alan D. D’Andrea, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • 1989 | Grant A. Mitchell, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
  • 1988 | Roger E. Breitbart, The Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
  • 1987 | Arthur L. Horwich, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • 1986 | Edward V. Prochownik, C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI
  • 1985 | Alan M. Krensky, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA
  • 1984 | Stylianos E. Antonarakis, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • 1983 | Alan L. Schwartz, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA