CONNECT.

Sat. May 5, 4-5:30pm - Celebration of Diversity & Inclusion Reception

Celebration of Diversity & Inclusion

You are cordially invited to the 2nd annual PAS reception to celebrate Diversity and Inclusion. Sponsored with AAP, APA, and APS.

Everyone Welcome!

Fairmont Hotel Library, Toronto Canada
Saturday, May 5, 2018
4:00pm – 5:30pm

Mon., May 7, 7-8:30am - SPR Breakfast Session with NCATS, Office of Rare Diseases Research Director Dr. Ann R. Pariser

SPR Breakfast Session with NCATS, Office of Rare Diseases Research Director Dr. Ann R. Pariser

Dr. Ann R. Pariser, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences National Institutes of Health

Mon, May 07
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM
Convention Center 501 AB

This session, led by Dr. Ann Pariser, will focus on NCATS’ innovative efforts to engage patients and their caregivers at every stage of the translational science spectrum. Examples of NCATS Research initiatives including Discovering New Therapeutic Uses for Existing Molecules, Tissue Chip for Drug Screening and the Office of Rare Diseases Research will be discussed from the perspective of how to address the multitude of translational science challenges facing both researchers and study participants.

Mon., May 7, 9-11:30am - SPR Presidential Scientific Plenary

SPR Presidential Scientific Plenary

Mon, May 07
9:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Convention Center 718 AB

Session Affiliations: Society for Pediatric Research

Presentations

9:00 AM
9:05 AM
Welcome
Michelle Gill, MD, PhD, President, Society for Pediatric Research, Associate Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Pulmonary Vascular Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

9:05 AM
9:07 AM
Introduction: SPR Young Investigator Award
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

9:07 AM
9:19 AM
SPR Young Investigator Award & Lecture: “On The Causes of Childhood Cancer”
Alex Kentsis, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Pharmacology, and Physiology & Biophysics, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

9:19 AM
9:22 AM
Introduction: The SPR Award Given in Honor of E. Mead Johnson
Kate Ackerman, SPR Strategy & Operations Officer, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY, and Christina J. Valentine, Neonatologist/Medical Director, North America, IFCN, Reckitt Benckiser/Mead Johnson Nutrition

9:22 AM
9:34 AM
The SPR Award & Lecture Given in Honor of E. Mead Johnson: “Human Monogenic Immunodeficiency Diseases with Susceptibility to Virus Infections”
Helen Su, MD, PhD, Senior Investigator and Chief of the Human Immunological Diseases Section, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

9:34 AM
9:37 AM
Introduction: SPR New Member Outstanding Science
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

9:37 AM
9:42 AM
SPR New Member Outstanding Science Lecture: “Inflammation and Hematopoiesis”
Katherine Y. King, MD, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital

9:42 AM
9:45 AM
Introduction: SPR New Member Outstanding Science
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

9:45 AM
9:50 AM
SPR New Member Outstanding Science Lecture: “The Unbearable Lightness of Being”
Indi Trehan, MD, MPH, DTM&H, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Washington University in St. Louis, Medical Director, Lao Friends Hospital for Children

9:50 AM
9:54 AM
Introduction: SPR Physician Scientist Award
Cynthia Bearer, Editor-in-Chief, Pediatric Research, University of Maryland School of Medicine

9:54 AM
10:04 AM
SPR Physician Scientist Award & Lecture: “Novel Gene Discovery in a Cohort of Patients with Craniofacial and Neurologic Syndromes”
Elizabeth Bhoj, MD, PhD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

10:04 AM
10:07 AM
Introduction: Runner-up of SPR Physician Scientist Award
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

10:07 AM
10:17 AM
Runner-up of SPR Physician Scientist Award & Lecture: “The Nasopharyngeal Microbiome: a Novel Target for Pneumonia Prevention?”
Matthew S. Kelly, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Duke University, Durham, NC

10:17 AM
10:37 AM
SPR Presidential Address: “The Journey to Discovery: Lessons from Scientists, Leaders and Children”
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

10:37 AM
10:42 AM
Introduction: SPR Special Invited Speaker
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

10:42 AM
11:12 AM
SPR Special Invited Speaker: “NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and Pediatric Research”
Anne R. Pariser, MD, Director, Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

11:12 AM
11:30 AM
Closing
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Mon., May 7, 11:30am-1pm - SPR Awards Presentations and Luncheon

SPR Awards Presentations and Luncheon

Mon, May 07
11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Convention Center 501 AB

11:30 AM
11:35 AM
Welcome
Michelle Gill, MD, President, Society for Pediatric Research, Associate Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Immunology, Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Pulmonary Vascular Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Presentations

11:35 AM
11:40 AM
Introduction and Presentation of Maureen Andrew Mentor Award
Valerie P. Opipari, MD, Chair, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Ravitz Foundation Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Professor, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology, University of Michigan

11:40 AM
11:42 AM
Maureen Andrew Mentor Awardee
Jeffrey R. Fineman, MD, Professor and Vice Chair of Pediatrics, Chief, Division Critical Care Medicine, Investigator, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital

11:42 AM
11:45 AM
Introduction and Presentation of Thomas Hazinski Distinguished Service Award
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

11:45 AM
11:47 AM
Thomas Hazinski Distinguished Service Awardee
Kate G. Ackerman, MD, Associate Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Dept. of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

11:47 AM
11:47 AM
SPR Physician Scientist Award Finalist
Lisa Bartnikas, Boston Children’s Hospital

11:47 AM
11:47 AM
SPR Physician Scientist Award Finalist
Pinar Gumus Balikcioglu, Duke University

11:47 AM
11:47 AM
SPR Physician Scientist Award Finalist
Natasha Hanners, UT Southwestern Medical Center

11:47 AM
11:48 AM
SPR Student Research Award
Jessica Thomson, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

11:48 AM
11:49 AM
SPR Student Research Award
Rachel Shenoi, Baylor College of Medicine

11:49 AM
11:50 AM
SPR Student Research Award
Sydney Rooney, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

11:50 AM
11:51 AM
SPR Student Research Award
Jennifer Varner, Duke University Medical Center

11:51 AM
11:52 AM
SPR Student Research Award
Sietske Berghuis, Beatrix Children’s Hospital, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen

11:52 AM
11:53 AM
SPR Student Research Award
Hannah Itell, Duke University Medical Center

11:53 AM
11:54 AM
SPR House Officer Research Award
Joseph Alge, Baylor College of Medicine

11:54 AM
11:55 AM
SPR House Officer Research Award
Colm Travers, UAB Hospital

11:55 AM
11:56 AM
SPR House Officer Research Award
Stephanie Davis-Rodriguez, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

11:56 AM
11:57 AM
SPR Junior Section Fellow Research Award
Fredrick Dapaah-Siakwan, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

11:57 AM
11:58 AM
SPR Junior Section Fellow Research Award
Andrew Franklin, Northwestern University/Ann & Robert H Lurie Children’s Hospital

11:58 AM
11:59 AM
SPR Junior Section Fellow Research Award
Jennifer Hendrick, University of Tennessee

11:59 AM
12:00 PM
SPR Junior Section Fellow Research Award
David Matlock, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

12:00 PM
12:01 PM
SPR Fellow Basic Science Research Award
Abbie Bauer, University of Washington

12:01 PM
12:02 PM
SPR Fellow Basic Science Research Award
Steven Jonas, University of California, Los Angles

12:02 PM
12:03 PM
SPR Fellow Basic Science Research Award
Kathleen Schwabenbauer, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

12:03 PM
12:04 PM
SPR Fellow Clinical Research Award
Anne Fuller, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

12:04 PM
12:05 PM
SPR Fellow Clinical Research Award
Megan Griffiths, Johns Hopkins

12:05 PM
12:06 PM
Japan Fellow Exchange Program Award
Kimino Fujimura, Shin-Yurigaoka General Hospital

12:06 PM
12:07 PM
Japan Fellow Exchange Program Award
Hironori Shibata, Keio University School of Medicine 
12:07 PM
12:08 PM
Japan Fellow Exchange Program Award
Toshihiko Suzuki, Nagoya University Hospital

12:08 PM
12:09 PM
European SPR Young Investigator Exchange Program Award
Nathalie Claessens, Wilhelmina, Children’s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht

12:09 PM
12:10 PM
SPR Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce: Eastern SPR Award
Suhasini Kaushal, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

12:10 PM
12:11 PM
SPR Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce: Midwest SPR Award
Courtney Rowan, Indiana University School Of Medicine

12:11 PM
12:12 PM
SPR Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce: Southern SPR Award
Rolando Macias, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio

12:12 PM
12:13 PM
SPR Travel Awards to Enhance Diversity in the Research Workforce: Western SPR Award
Viviana Fajardo, University of California Los Angeles

12:13 PM
12:14 PM
Douglas K. Richardson Award
Bonnie Ramsey, Seattle Children’s

12:14 PM
12:15 PM
APS/SPR Mary Ellen Avery Neonatal Research Award
Richard Martin, Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital

12:15 PM
12:16 PM
David G. Nathan Award in Basic Research Award
Julie Nogee, Washington University School of Medicine

12:16 PM
12:17 PM
Richard D. Rowe Award for Clinical Research Award
Catherine Buck, Brown University

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Eastern SPR (ESPR) Faculty Award
Raul Chavez-Valdez

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Eastern SPR (ESPR) Fellow Award
Sharina Rajbhandari, New York Medical College; Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) Frederic M. Kenney Award for Outstanding Fellow or Resident
Stacy Kern, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) Jack Metcoff Award for Outstanding Resident or Fellow
Katie Satrom, University of Minnesota

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) James Sutherland Award
Jennifer Bermick, University of Michigan

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) James Sutherland Awards
David Gordon, University of Iowa

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) Council Award
Haley Bremer, Columbia University

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) Stanley Phillips Award
June Hu, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Midwest SPR (MWSPR) William Segar Award
John Feister, Nationwide Children’s Hospital

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Southern SPR (SSPR) Young Investigator Award (Clinical Research)
Erynn Bergner, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Southern SPR (SSPR) Young Investigator Award (Basic Science)
Mohamed Khass, University of Alabama-Birmingham

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Western SPR (WSPR) Abbott Nutrition Young Investigator Award
Alison Chu, University of California Los Angeles

12:17 PM
12:17 PM
Western SPR (WSPR) Abbott Nutrition Pediatric Trainee Research Award
Brianna MacQueen, University of Utah

12:17 PM
12:22 PM
Closing
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

COLLABORATE.

Sat., May 5, 8-10am - SPR Research Toolbox: Hands-On Practical Workshop on Genetic and Genomics Tools to Study Human Health and Disease

SPR Research Toolbox: Hands-On Practical Workshop on Genetic and Genomics Tools to Study Human Health and Disease

Sat, May 05
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Convention Center 703

Session Tracks: Academic and Research Skills, Basic Science, Bioinformatics/Proteomics, Developmental Biology, Genetics
Session Affiliations: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Pediatric Society, Society for Pediatric Research
Target Audience: Child health researchers or clinicians with an interest in: Human Genetics, Research in Genetics including model organisms, Developmental Biology, and Precision Medicine.
Objectives: 1. Describe tools and tips for learning more about human disease candidate genes 2. Describe database resources and tools for various model organisms including the Alliance of Genome Resources and Mouse Genome Informatics 3. To practice using the tools introduced in the workshop by going through a set of real examples including examples brought by the audience.

In this workshop, the presenters will guide audience through various topics including discovery of candidate genes associated with human diseases or sets of phenotypes and potential mouse models of human disease. The Human-Mouse Disease Connection (HMDC) portal will be presented, which is part of Mouse Genome Informatics (http://www.informatics.jax.org) database. The MGI database is an expert curated open sourced database that integrates genetic, genomic, phenotype, functional, expression, and disease data to provide comprehensive biological information for users. MGI also includes link out to various resources and databases on our pages. The new Alliance of Genome Resources (http://www.alliancegenome.org) will also be presented with updates about current and future developments planned for that resource. Audience will learn easy-to-use tools to expedite discovery of candidate genes for disease or to identify what a gene does with easy to understand information.

Attendees are encouraged to bring their laptop or tablet to follow along. The audience will work on examples that require using online tools on human genetics and gene set analysis. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own diagnostic genetic puzzles and favorite genes to this workshop.

Session Chairs
Workshop Co-Leader
Kate Ackerman, University of Rochester Medical Center
Workshop Co-Leader
David Shaw, The Jackson Laboratory

Sat., May 5, 10:30am-12pm - PAS Opening General Session and Keynote Speaker/Joseph St. Geme Leadership Award

PAS Opening General Session and Keynote Speaker/Joseph St. Geme Leadership Award

Sat, May 05
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Convention Center 718 AB

Session Affiliations: American Academy of Pediatrics, Academic Pediatric Association, American Pediatric Society, Society for Pediatric Research, PAS Labs

Session Chair
Chair
Thomas Shanley, Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

Presentations

10:30 AM
10:35 AM
PAS Welcome
Thomas Shanley, Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

10:35 AM
Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Leadership Award – Recipient: Mark Schuster, MD, PhD

10:55 AM
11:00 AM
Introduction of Debbie Anagnostelis Keynote Address
Thomas Shanley, Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

11:00 AM
11:45 AM
Debbie Anagnostelis Keynote Address: The Triumph of Human Spirit
Roberto Canessa, Italian Hospital of Montevideo

11:45 AM
11:50 AM
Closing Remarks
Thomas Shanley, Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

Mon., May 7, 3:30-5:30pm - SPR Research Toolbox: Implementing Transcriptomics into Translational Research in Children

SPR Research Toolbox: Implementing Transcriptomics into Translational Research in Children

Mon, May 07
3:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Convention Center 717 A

Session Tracks: Academic and Research Skills, Basic Science
Session Affiliations: Society for Pediatric Research, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Target Audience: This workshop is open to students, residents, fellows, faculty and other researchers interested in learning principles relevant to transcriptomics research in children.
Objectives: • Plan appropriate experimental designs for observational or interventional clinical studies utilizing transcriptomics • Recognize the methods/assays employed for RNA sample collection and processing considerations in transcriptomics research, with a focus on utilizing minimally invasive samples and small blood volumes • Gain new insights into the analytical tools and bioinformatics approaches used in transcriptomics research.

Whole-genome transcriptional profiling (transcriptomics) is a powerful approach to identify novel biomarkers and mechanisms of human diseases. Of all the systems-scale molecular profiling technologies available, genomic approaches are the most comprehensive and robust. Transcriptional profiling accurately reflects both dynamic changes in cellular composition and cellular response during the course of disease. Transcriptomics has become an essential tool in conducting clinical and translational research at all levels including hypothesis generation, defining disease mechanisms and signaling pathways, identification of disease markers and risk assessment, and monitoring response to interventions.

This interactive session will introduce a basic understanding of study design and methods of transcriptional profiling and systems scale data analysis that can be applied to clinical and translational studies with specific focus on pediatric populations. By providing specific clinical questions and examples, the first hour will focus on practical considerations of sample collection,  methodologies for profiling, and experimental design considerations. The second hour will focus on selecting and implementing suitable methods for data analysis and results interpretation and will include interactive demonstrations. At the end of this workshop attendees will be able to identify the optimal type of samples suitable for transcriptional profiling, the main tenets  for designing and applying transcriptomics into a clinical study, and the optimal methods and tools for data processing and analyses.

Session Chairs
Workshop Co-Leader
Matthew Altman, University of Washington
Workshop Co-Leader
Asuncion Mejias

SPR SPONSORED RESEARCH HELP DESK

Metro Toronto Convention Center – South Level 600

Saturday, May 5, 2018

8-9 AM Todd Florin K23 applications, large administrative datasets, biomarkers in clinical research, Emergency Medicine, informed consent, lower respiratory tract infections
9-10:30 AM Anna Penn SPR membership, cross-disciplinary research models
10:30 AM-12 PM “dark” for opening session
12-1 PM David Shaw Genetics and Mouse Models of Disease, Using genetic databases for gene information discovery
1-2 PM Prachi Shah Using larget databases & research in developmental science
2-3 PM Lucas Hoffman microbiome and microbiology studies
3-4 PM Constantine A. Stratakis Research in endocrinology, molecular disease mechanism research, working at NIH
4-5 PM Samir Shah Health services research; Succeeding in clinical research as junior faculty

Sunday, May 6, 2018

8-9 AM Carlton Bates grant writing, mouse as a model organism, pediatric nephrology
9-10 AM Thomas Havranek Clinical research; neonatology
10-11 AM Maureen Su autoimmune endocrinopathies, immunology research
11AM -12PM Shari Barkin pediatric obesity, community-centered clinical research
12-1 PM Neera Gupta launching a multicenter study
1-2 PM Joel Hirschhorn Human genetics for polygenic DISORDERS; PEDIATRIC endocrinology
2-3 PM Vidu Garg Setting up and managing a research laboratory
3-4 PM Mara Becker large registries and CTPS, rheum, translational and clinical pharmacology research
4-5 PM Jamie Lohr developmental biology/cardiac development research (Including stem and progenitor cells); Neonatal screening (CCHD screening); Equity and Diversity/Policy

CATALYZE RESEARCH.

Sun., May 6, 8-10am - From Bench-to Bassinet: How the NHLBI Program in Congenital Heart Diseases Can Benefit the Entire Pediatric Research Community

From Bench-to Bassinet: How the NHLBI Program in Congenital Heart Diseases Can Benefit the Entire Pediatric Research Community

Sun, May 06
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Convention Center 202 A-D

Session Tracks: Cardiology, Neonatology
Session Affiliations: Society for Pediatric Research
Objectives: 1. Discuss the NHLBI Bench-To-Bassinet program with emphasis on the interactions of its component networks and the goal of moving knowledge from basic discoveries to clinical care and population health. 2. Discuss the major achievements of this initiative 3. Present examples of the resources that were generated by B2B and how they can be accessed by investigators in the consortium and publicly.

The NHLBI developed the Bench-to-Bassinet Program (B2B) to accelerate basic, translational and clinical discoveries in pediatric heart disease. The program contains three research networks, noted below, that have enrolled over 11,000 patients with pediatric heart disease and their families to date. Investigators from the Cardiovascular Development Consortium (CvDC), Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium (PCGC) and Pediatric Heart Network (PHN) will summarize the major goals and achievements of each of these networks and the impact on current and future research and clinical care. Speakers will characterize the large data sets created through the B2B program that are available to researchers both within the consortiums and publicly and explain how they can be accessed by interested investigators. The session will include also examples of how the publicly available datasets were utilized by junior investigators in and outside the consortiums.

Session Chairs
Chair
Lazaros Kochilas, Children’s Health Care of Atlanta
Chair
Jamie Lohr, Mayo Clinic

Presentations

8:00 AM
8:10 AM
Intoduction and Overview
Victoria Pemberton, NIH

8:10 AM
8:35 AM
Breakthroughs and Resources from the Cardiovascular Development Consortium
H. Joseph Yost

8:35 AM
9:00 AM
The Pediatric Cardiac Genetics Consortium: >10,000 CHD and Thee
Bruce Gelb, Icahn School of Medicine

9:00 AM
9:25 AM
The Pediatric Heart Network: Successes and Challenges in Multicenter Studies in Pediatric Heart Diseases
Victoria Pemberton, NIH

9:25 AM
9:45 AM
Navigating PHN and PCGC Infrastructure, Data, and Opportunities: A Junior Investigator’s Perspective
Thomas Miller, University of Utah

Sun., May 6, 8-10am - The Next Frontier: Answering Mechanistic Questions in Clinical Trials in Pediatric Asthma - Updates from the NIAID Inner City Asthma Consortium

The Next Frontier: Answering Mechanistic Questions in Clinical Trials in Pediatric Asthma – Updates from the NIAID Inner City Asthma Consortium

Sun, May 06
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Convention Center 206 A-D

Session Tracks: Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Clinical & Translational Research
Session Affiliations: Society for Pediatric Research, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Objectives: 1. Discuss results of 3 mechanistic studies integrated into a large-scale trial of anti-IgE therapy (omalizumab) in children with allergic asthma. 2. Discuss the effects of allergy and anti-IgE therapy on rhinovirus infections and illnesses in children with allergic asthma. 3. Discuss the impact of anti-IgE therapy on plasmacytoid dendritic cell antiviral responses. 4. Discuss the link between the airway microbiome, rhinovirus infections and disease exacerbations in children with allergic asthma. 5. Review how respiratory viral infections alter airway gene expression and promote asthma exacerbation, and demonstrate how nasal transcriptomics will be integrated into an upcoming clinical trial of anti-IL-5 to address novel mechanistic questions in children with allergic asthma.

Allergic asthma, a leading diagnosis in children, represents the focus of numerous clinical trials aimed at decreasing exacerbations associated with this disease. The NIAID-sponsored Inner City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) shares in these efforts, with the specific goal of evaluating immunebased treatment strategies in children with allergic asthma. While the synergistic contribution of respiratory viral infections and atopy to the development of asthma exacerbations has long been recognized, the mechanisms underlying this are incompletely understood. To address these fundamental gaps in our understanding of asthma pathogenesis, novel mechanistic studies investigating rhinovirus infections and illnesses, dendritic cell antiviral Type I interferon responses, and the airway microbiome and its association with rhinovirus infections and asthma exacerbations were integrated into a large clinical trial of anti-IgE therapy (omalizumab) in children with allergic asthma. The results of each of these unique translational mechanistic studies will be presented in this session. In addition, ICAC has recently initiated innovative airway transcriptomics studies to investigate how respiratory viral infections alter airway gene expression and promote asthma exacerbations. Results of these studies and demonstration of the integration of nasal transcriptomics into an upcoming clinical trial of anti-IL-5 therapy in children with allergic asthma will also be presented in this session.

Session Chair
Chair
Kirsten Kloepfer, Indiana University School of Medicine

Presentations

8:00 AM
8:25 AM
Effects of Allergy on Rhinovirus Infections, Illnesses and Exacerbations of Asthma
James Gern, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

8:25 AM
8:45 AM
Enhanced Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Antiviral Responses After Omalizumab
Michelle Gill, UT Southwestern Medical Center

8:45 AM
9:05 AM
Impact of the Airway Microbiome on Rhinovirus Infection and Exacerbation in Pediatric Asthma
Kathryn McCauley, University of California San Francisco

9:05 AM
9:25 AM
How Do Respiratory Infections Alter Airway Gene Expression and Promote Asthma Exacerbation?
Matthew Altman, University of Washington

Mon., May 7, 3:30-5:30pm - The Future is Now: RAPID Genome Sequencing is a Game Changer in Neonatal, Pediatric, and Cardiac Intensive Care

The Future is Now: RAPID Genome Sequencing is a Game Changer in Neonatal, Pediatric, and Cardiac Intensive Care

Mon, May 07
3:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Convention Center 206 A-D

Session Tracks: Clinical & Translational Research, Critical Care, Genetics, Neonatology
Session Affiliations: Society for Pediatric Research
Objectives: 1. Rapid genome sequencing as a diagnostic technology to improve the care of acutely ill infants in neonatal, pediatric and cardiac ICUs. 2. Challenges for the implementation of rapid genome sequencing in neonatal, pediatric and cardiac ICUs. 3. Rapid genome sequencing as a platform for downstream functional studies, gene discovery and therapeutic implications.

Genome sequencing (GS) has received relatively little attention by clinicians in the NICU, PICU and CICU as a diagnostic technology to improve the care of acutely ill infants and children. Further, the need for rapid diagnosis using GS is critical in an important proportion of those patients because it may affect treatment options, management trajectories and outcomes. Over the last five years, a few Institutions have attempted to overcome barriers to the rapid diagnosis in NICUs, PICUs and CICUs by implementing rapid GS (turn-around time of a week). Early data suggests that, in a surprisingly large number of acutely ill infants, rapid GS can determine the molecular cause of disease, and in a significant proportion of cases, treatment can be tailored accordingly, resulting in improved outcomes. The diagnostic rates have approached 70% in few studies. Questions yet to be addressed include patient selection criteria to optimize diagnostic efficiency, optimal turn-around times and associated costs of these tests. In this proposal, researchers performing such studies will present their findings and ongoing research, address uncertainties, and discuss the role of rapid GS in revolutionizing NICU, PICU and CICU care. They will also discuss how this is aiding scientific advancement including gene discovery, functional genomics and novel therapeutics.

Session Chairs
Chair
Pankaj Agrawal, Boston Children’s Hospital

Chair
Luca Brunelli, University of Nebraska Medical Center

Presentations

3:30 PM
3:55 PM
Same Day Genome Sequencing Improves ICU Outcomes
Stephen Kingsmore

3:55 PM
4:20 PM
Rapid Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing in the NICU: Diagnostic Rates and Patient Selection Criteria
Luca Brunelli, University of Nebraska Medical Center

4:20 PM
4:45 PM
Genomic Sequencing in the NICU: Rapid Sequencing, Gene Discovery and Screening
Pankaj Agrawal, Boston Children’s Hospital

4:45 PM
5:10 PM
Downstream Benefits of Rapid Sequencing: Therapeutics, Discovery and Science
Mustafa Khokha, Yale University School of Medicine

Tue., May 8, 12:15-2:15pm - The Inflammation Superhighway: Tolls, Signals, and Pathways

The Inflammation Superhighway: Tolls, Signals, and Pathways

Tue, May 08
12:15 PM – 2:15 PM
Convention Center 106

Session Tracks: Basic Science, Clinical & Translational Research, Neonatology
Session Affiliations: American Pediatric Society, Society for Pediatric Research
Objectives: 1. Understand multiple infectious and non-infectious regulators of innate immunity leading to inflammatory disorders. 2. Understand the role of Toll-Like Receptors and signaling pathways that lead to the formation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and activation of IL1ß and IL18. 3. Explore the therapeutic potential of interfering with these pathways to ameliorate a wide variety of disorders promoted by activation of the innate immune system.

The innate immune system is an early, non-specific, yet robust system that senses bacterial and viral attack or endogenous danger signals, and mobilizes inflammatory cells as a response. Microbes and other environmental challenges display unique structures called PathogenAssociated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), while tissue injury results in the production of endogenous ligands called Danger-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) that are recognized by specific Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs). These include Toll-Like Receptors, named after Toll, a protein identified in Drosophilia that interacts with fungi and activates NFkB. Interaction of bacterial and viral components with TLRs initiates a robust elaboration of cytokines and growth factors, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), leading to shock, surfactant deficiency, respiratory distress and a systemic inflammatory response.

Interleukin 1 beta (IL1ß) and IL18 are key master regulators of inflammation and have been implicated in the inflammatory responses in a wide variety of adult, pediatric and neonatal diseases. A key family of exclusively intracellular proteins called NOD-like Receptors (NLRs) are key mediators of the innate immune system. One such NLR, NLRP3, forms a protein complex with the adaptor molecule ASC and pro-caspase1 to form the NLRP3 inflammasome. Activation of the inflammasome requires two signals. First, tissue injury results in the elaboration of endogenous danger signals that stimulate TLRs. Subsequent TLR signaling through the TLR/IL1R adaptor molecule, MyD88, activates a number of signaling pathways, including NFkB, and increases the expression of pro-IL1ß and pro-IL18. The second signal is the activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7 by extracellular ATP that results in the formation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, with subsequent activation of caspase 1 and the processing of pro-IL1ß and pro-IL18 to mature IL1ß and IL18. IL1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous blocker of the IL1 receptor and maintains homeostatic balance.

This Scientific Session will demonstrate the wide reach of the innate immune system in pediatric diseases and the potential for therapeutic interventions to ameliorate and/or prevent them.

Session Chairs
Chair
Eleanor Molloy, Trinity College, the University of Dublin Ireland
Chair
Rashmin Savani

Presentations

12:15 PM
12:20 PM
Introduction
Rashmin Savani

12:20 PM
12:40 PM
Inflammsome Blockade for the Prevention of BPD
Rashmin Savani

12:40 PM
1:00 PM
Translational Human Models of Inflammation in Neonatal Encephalopathy at Birth and Long Term Follow Up
Eleanor Molloy, Trinity College, the University of Dublin

1:00 PM
1:20 PM
Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Without the NLRP3 Inflammasome
Ola Saugstad, University of Oslo

1:20 PM
1:40 PM
IL18, IL17A and Neonatal Sepsis
James Wynn, University of Iowa

1:40 PM
2:00 PM
Preterm Birth, Neonatal Morbidity and the Promise of IL1ß Blockade 
Sylvain Chemtob